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Thread: would you live like it was the year 1800

  1. #31
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    There are Amish groups (not all ) which still are very conservative and live without electricity, powered equipment, etc. They make their own clothes (purchase cloth), store self grown food, use horses, etc. They are located all over the US and in several foreign countries, wherever they can find land to grow food. As in the 1800s, they have found that community and shared resources was most helpful to the individual and family. It is interesting to research how they do it and how they strive to stay outside of the "English" labor saving life.

  2. #32
    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
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    while it is true that women could not own property in the US and had few rights, Boston had compulsory education. They also had stocks and a whipping post. If it was 1800 in London and your parents died of Pestilence then you would be turned out on the streets even as a young child. Gangs of begging children roamed the streets of London but in the US there were Orphan asylums or you would be given to a farm family for labor if they wanted you (risky I know, some turned out quite well, others abused). Not everyone were farmers, though. There were many servants to the rich people, bankers, and bakeries, shipbuilders and repairers, blacksmiths, potters, cooks, silversmiths, fishermen, merchants and seamstresses. If you made it to the shores of the East Coast of the US you could set off for the new frontier, the west, pretty much by walking across the country, which took a year or two.
    If you were African American in the southern US, you were probably a slave as 20% of the US population were slaves. Your fate largely depended on your owner. Some were kind, some were brutal.
    If you were native American, you started seeing settlers come into your area with their puzzling customs, such as killing more than you can eat, and other non sustainable ways of life.
    Life expectancy was much lower as many children died in childbirth and infancy.

    So I would not want to live like it was 1800.

    As an avid gardener I find that trying to produce a large quantity of my own food is quite difficult, but I have many skills, such as sewing and baking that I could use to barter. I think many of the people here are seeking a way to live a simpler, gentler life, but I think I would prefer a life more like the 50's in the US. Not perfect, but much simpler and idealistic.

  3. #33
    Senior Member ctg492's Avatar
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    Sweetana3
    In our area up north we have few differing groups of Amish. They are much more classic then farther south groups. Differing each other by shirt colors. Some are very old time, others use propane. What I have found is no matter how old school the groups are they all seem to know how to make and sell, construction, for cash from the rest of us. Also Medical needs, most Mothers seem to understand the need to get the children the medical care they need. One little boy two years ago had cancer and had to be in U of M for a great period of time, which we were all thankfull for. So we can say they shun modern ways, but really it is only to a point. I have always found that interesting. The buggies in the Mcdonalds drive through, now that is strange to me.

  4. #34
    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctg492 View Post
    Sweetana3
    In our area up north we have few differing groups of Amish. They are much more classic then farther south groups. Differing each other by shirt colors. Some are very old time, others use propane. What I have found is no matter how old school the groups are they all seem to know how to make and sell, construction, for cash from the rest of us. Also Medical needs, most Mothers seem to understand the need to get the children the medical care they need. One little boy two years ago had cancer and had to be in U of M for a great period of time, which we were all thankfull for. So we can say they shun modern ways, but really it is only to a point. I have always found that interesting. The buggies in the Mcdonalds drive through, now that is strange to me.
    I have seen the same with the Amish groups. One day I saw a buggy at the drive through atm, which I thought was quite funny. Also, if you go to largely Amish areas, you will see many instances of melding with modern ways. One farm has big electric refrigerated coolers for the meat pies they sell for example. But I don't see how they can survive with taxes and the price of land unless they give in - many years ago there was plentiful land for free or very low cost and if you had a large family you could all live off the land. Those days are long gone with our current world population.

  5. #35
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    Instead of thinking "going BACK to the 1800's", why not think, what would the world (this world, present time) be like without cheap oil? Wait, that has already been done, several fiction books by Kunstler - World Made by Hand series of books.

    So, while you might still have the equalities of life, and the technologies of this time, you might not be able to use them because of the expense of energy. If there was no oil, or extremely expensive oil, then you also would not have all of the nice amenities that we have now.

    Thereby, we'd be going back to the 1800's in agriculture, transportation, medicines/health care, communication, housing, energy, and education, but living in the 2000's.

  6. #36
    Senior Member Gardenarian's Avatar
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    Thanks ljevtich! I just ordered the "World Made by Hand" from my library.
    You might also like S.M. Stirling's "Emberverse" series

  7. #37
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    I've been living like its 1800 all week due to no power, and I can say: IT SUCKS. At least nowadays, there's the library for internet access.

  8. #38
    Senior Member ctg492's Avatar
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    herbgeek, The second I mean the second the power goes out we all feel like we have to wash hands, go to the bathroom, (well goes out with no power), open the fridge and feel cold or hot and disconnected from the outside world.

  9. #39
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I hope James Howard Kunstler spends his eternity in 1800, personally, since he seems to be so fervently longing for its return.

    And no, I haven't the faintest desire to live any time but now. And maybe 50 years from now, which isn't likely.

  10. #40
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    Could I? Sure. Would I? No. Not having the choice. People create conveniences because some things are just plain unpleasant or difficult. Chamberpot? No thanks. Just had my bathroom remodeled and had to use a porta potty for 4 days I HATED it. And no bath/shower. No. I wouldn't. I'm spoiled rotten.

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