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Thread: Anti-Inflammatory Diet

  1. #81
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    I prefer to use nappa cabbage leaves for rollups and wraps instead of lettuce leaves -- sturdier, more uniform size, and a tad more nutrition than (shudder!) iceberg lettuce.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  2. #82
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    Today I cooked some spinach. I just used some olive oil and sauteed it in my cast iron skillet. I put a tiny bit of salt on it and some freshly ground black pepper.

    It was palatable. I think I could do that a couple times a week.
    I came from a real tough neighborhood. I put my hand in some cement and felt another hand." -- Rodney Dangerfield

  3. #83
    Senior Member Gardenarian's Avatar
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    I find spinach gets that weird bitter taste when cooked in cast iron - it's the oxalic acid. I boil it in stainless or stir fry in a carbon steel skillet.

  4. #84
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultralight View Post
    Today I cooked some spinach. I just used some olive oil and sauteed it in my cast iron skillet. I put a tiny bit of salt on it and some freshly ground black pepper.
    If you like and can eat garlic, a little minced garlic, cooked to soft but not burned, would go great. Or try sprinkling a little garlic powder on the cooked spinach. Might be even better!
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  5. #85
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I like spinach raw in salads, and cooked in Joe's Special: https://www.saveur.com/article/Recip...c-Joes-Special

    You can sneak it into other dishes, too, like soups--though I like heartier greens like kale for that.

  6. #86
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    Onion sauteed first, then wilt in spinach...finish off with two cracked eggs and you have a simple scramble for breakfast that's very healthy

  7. #87
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    I have made a few spanokoriza in the last month or two, but it is getting boring (spinach and rice - and it's more spinach than rice, no matter the herbs, allums and lemon, is only so exciting) so going to give that one a rest for awhile because getting bored. I've made the same thing with chickpeas instead of rice, it's somewhat better, but it's always fresh chickpeas and involves soaking them etc.. The best thing I make with spinach is a casserole with spinach and salmon topped with a few breadcrumbs, that one is pretty good to have from time to time.

    But if I was cooking a green in olive oil, garlic etc. I definitely prefer chard over spinach.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  8. #88
    Junior Member heatmiser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    I did a quick google on the salt issue. The most interesting thing I ran across is that most of our salt intake comes from processed food, not table salt. I checked my mustard and ketchup and it's there. Plus in canned beans, tomato sauces, and soups. It's good evidence to do our own food preparation. And indeed may not have iodine. My choice is to depend on other dietary sources for iodine as I'd like to keep my salt intake low, but it's one of those things that is not perfectly obvious.
    I use salt substitute - potassium chloride. I get plenty of sodium chloride table salt hidden in any processed or restaurant foods that I eat,
    and my point of view is that folks usually don't get enough potassium anyway. I realize there are folks who may feel passionately
    that potassium chloride is just another nasty chemical, and I respect those feelings.
    My doctor likes the stuff though, and it makes my life more pleasant.

    I actually do happen to eat iodine-rich powdered dried kelp in cooking anyway; I live about an hour away from salt water
    and all I have to do is gather the stuff and dry it. :-)

    71bI5lddxCL._SY679_.jpg s-l300.jpg 61D8tfjYoCL._SX425_.jpg

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultralight View Post
    Because I have some health issues of the chronic variety (not getting into any details) I have been on an anti-inflammatory diet.

    No gluten. No deep fried food. No refined grains. I use only olive oil and coconut oil. I don't eat desserts or candy anyway. I eat fresh fruits and veggies, though I steam, roast, or saute the veggies. I also eat beans and lentils.

    All my foods are whole, unprocessed, and rather fresh. Though I do eat organic, local saurkraut and kefir (no other dairy products though).

    And for the hell of it I also stopped adding salt to foods.I have not shaken the shaker since March.

    So here I am 23 days into this...

    I feel a little better. And I am somewhat accustomed to eating these flavorless foods.

    Anyone else on this diet?
    I haven't gone a specific diet. But I also suffer from a lot of inflammation. The last couple of months I've kind of sorta given up wheat and therefore gluten I suppose. I use corn tortillas mostly and rice and rice noodles
    . I don't mind adding salt. I eat because it adds so much flavor and since I don't eat much processed foods I don't worry about it. I eat some cheese but not much and no other dairy other than the occasional bit of sour cream or cream cheese . Mostly it's veggies with some chicken. I actually do eat quite a bit of eggs. Some days I have really awful pain days but in general there has been some improvement. I can't specifically pinpoint it any one thing. I like veggies...so it's lots of salads and stirfries and cooked veggies. Lately I've been having some terrible sugar cravings which isn't typical.

  10. #90
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    We were just talking about this issue of inflammation. A friend has cut out all sugar and most simple carbs. Still uses whole wheat and brown rice. Been on the plan for over a year. Finds her sugar cravings are gone until she mistakenly gets something with sugar in it and then they come back for awhile. She says her hands and other joints are much better and she is not on the OTC pain relievers anymore.

    She thinks the reaction to sugar has a genetic connection. Her whole family (in their 50s/60s) are sugar sensitive.

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