Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Not hearing back

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    2,272

    Not hearing back

    The recent thread about reposting of jobs made me think of my experiences over the past several years. Someone said it was rude of an employer not to tell someone they did not get a job, but in my experience, this has been the norm for the past 10 years or so, much worse in last 5 years. At least half the time, no acknowledgment of any kind, even after an interview.
    I was taking it personally, but my 36 year old son told me this was the new norm.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    beyond the pale
    Posts
    2,544
    I agree, Tybee. Years ago I ran into someone who had applied for a job where I was working. She never heard back after the interview, so I had to break the news to her that the job was filled. I didn't like being put in that position so I complained to our HR person that it was unprofessional (not to mention lazy, although I didn't say that) to not notify the final candidates of the outcome.
    Never found out if they changed their practices, but there's even less excuse these days because a personal email would take only a few second to send.

  3. #3
    Moderator Float On's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    By a lake in MO
    Posts
    4,474
    Do we still send follow-ups thanking for the opportunity to interview?
    I do. It actually once lead to an employer calling me to come back in and re-interview when the person they hired turned out to be a flake.
    Float On: My "Happy Place" is on my little kayak in the coves of Table Rock Lake.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    beyond the pale
    Posts
    2,544
    Quote Originally Posted by Float On View Post
    Do we still send follow-ups thanking for the opportunity to interview?
    I do. It actually once lead to an employer calling me to come back in and re-interview when the person they hired turned out to be a flake.
    I don't think it would be a dealbreaker if you didn't send one, but yes, I think it's still good manners and also reinforces that you really want the position.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    2,272
    Yes, Float, always have done so, and this does not seem to make the slightest bit of difference. I think it is because of the shift to computer handling of the job search.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    1,812
    At my large hospital (~3500 employees) we contact every single interviewee with an answer on way or another. I canít imagine just not giving them an answer.

    Once in a while I get a thank you note after an interview - itís quite unusual.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,926
    For one thing most jobs are going through a recruiter for me so if I heard a no it would be through a recruiter generally, the one that wasn't I got a no from the company. So do recruiters get back to you, oh maybe 60-70% of the time, you can always follow up.

    Writing a thank you note is good but you have to be very on the ball and ask for business cards at the end of the interview so you have this contact info etc. (and if it's just a phone interview that doesn't apply obviously), so it's easy to forget. Of course there was one interview where they said they would take a month to hire or something so I asked if I thought my chances were good and got "I wouldn't say good ..." and this was an interview where they also picked apart my resume "I see you don't have this and that". Well gee thanks, you could just not hire me without picking me apart you know. No thank you for you.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  8. #8
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,671
    At my former employer it was considered absolutely rude and inappropriate not to notify an internal candidate. All candidates were supposed to get some type of canned communication, but it was a major faux pas not to notify an internal candidate, and hiring manager or recruiter was also expected to provide some useful feedback if asked.

  9. #9
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saint Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    5,009
    Quote Originally Posted by ApatheticNoMore View Post
    Of course there was one interview where they said they would take a month to hire or something so I asked if I thought my chances were good and got "I wouldn't say good ..." and this was an interview where they also picked apart my resume "I see you don't have this and that". Well gee thanks, you could just not hire me without picking me apart you know. No thank you for you.
    Then there are the folks who want to know why they didn't get the position -- understandable, but a difficult question for those involved to answer on the spot. I think I'd rather know why I didn't get the job (or wasn't a frontrunner) whether it was because I lacked the experience they sought or that information simply wasn't prominent on my resume.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  10. #10
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    12,961
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveinMN View Post
    Then there are the folks who want to know why they didn't get the position -- understandable, but a difficult question for those involved to answer on the spot. I think I'd rather know why I didn't get the job (or wasn't a frontrunner) whether it was because I lacked the experience they sought or that information simply wasn't prominent on my resume.
    or what if they think you are a dweeb? How does the hiring manager communicate that?!!! Haha. We all probably fear that, but most of the time rejections come from there being a better candidate in terms of experience and personal qualities.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •