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Thread: How old to retire?

  1. #31
    Senior Member Gardenarian's Avatar
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    I worked full time till my daughter was born when I was 41. I continued working part time till I was 58 and we decided to move. Luckily that was also the year I became vested in my pension.

    I didn't plan on continuing to work, but I seem to keep be drawn back to the library world. I'm currently only a substitute, which lets me pick and choose my hours.

    I enjoy working a couple days a week - more than that and I lose my enthusiasm rapidly.

    I think I keep working because I haven't yet found a calling for this third stage of life. It's also a good way to meet people and become involved in a new town.

    We moved from a very expensive area to one more affordable, which gave a huge boost to our savings. That was no sacrifice; I love my new town and was thoroughly done with the congestion and busy-ness of the Bay Area.

    I do hope to find a creative outlet that I will find fulfilling in the years to come. I have bought 2 run down houses and fixed them up and rented them. Maybe renovation will be my path - I've always been a house person. I've got another on my radar now...though physically it's pretty challenging for me.

    I'm thoroughly happy with my retirement, and it's delightful to actually have choices!

  2. #32
    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan View Post
    No special plans immediately, although we are talking about taking a 3 month motorhome trip to Alaska next summer.
    fun! I hope you get to do it. We have done four multi month RV trips mainly to national and state parks. Last year was PEI and Nova Scotia. We do things like fireman’s breakfasts, local music events, historical houses, monuments and gardens, local museums and almost never have TV hookups so read and play games when we are in for the night. You meet the nicest people and see so much of our beautiful continent. Planning this years trip now.

  3. #33
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    Age 62, almost exactly a year ago. Had been working full-time for 40 years, since graduating from college, and I was ready.
    I get a small pension (under $20,000/year) and Soc. Sec. and a small amount of rental house income from a family member, and back of the envelope financials showed that would be enough. I enjoyed my co-workers and my work but I also wanted to enjoy retirement while I still had my health, as others have said.
    Our lifestyle is very similar to flowerseverywhere so that part wasn't a change - still like to spend time reading, catching a matinee, decluttering and organizing the house, helping family, hanging out with friends, wandering around the local botanical garden or museums, taking day trips, etc. Also being able to babysit my only grandchild for 2 days/week is a real treat and helps her parents out greatly.

  4. #34
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lainey View Post
    ...
    Our lifestyle is very similar to flowerseverywhere so that part wasn't a change - still like to spend time reading, catching a matinee, decluttering and organizing the house, helping family, hanging out with friends, wandering around the local botanical garden or museums, taking day trips, etc. Also being able to babysit my only grandchild for 2 days/week is a real treat and helps her parents out greatly.
    I swear, I read that "catching a manatee." Thanks for an always needed laugh.
    Your retirement sounds perfect.

  5. #35
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    I swear, I read that "catching a manatee."
    I did too. It was a funny visual.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan View Post
    No special plans immediately, although we are talking about taking a 3 month motorhome trip to Alaska next summer.
    Have you been to Alaska before? I was truly disappointed. I expected it to be as awesome as Glacier but it was just ok. It was expensive and it did not have the grandeur of Glacier. I have no desire to go back.

  7. #37
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    I'm enjoying reading about everyone's plans and experiences. Good for you, Alan! I look forward to hearing of your travels!

  8. #38
    Simpleton Alan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frugal-one View Post
    Have you been to Alaska before? I was truly disappointed. I expected it to be as awesome as Glacier but it was just ok. It was expensive and it did not have the grandeur of Glacier. I have no desire to go back.
    Yes, I lived there for three years in the mid 70's. Met my wife and married her there in 1976 and our now 39 year old daughter was conceived there. We haven't been back since 1978 so this will be a nostalgia trip.
    "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not one bit simpler." ~ Albert Einstein

  9. #39
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    All these trips and activities in retirement sound wonderful. Like Catherine, I need to continue to work however for money. I think I would like to work for money until I am about 70-75. Obviously, I will continue to work after retirement, as many have pointed out.
    And yes, catching a manatee is basically my idea of a good retirement. I had the experience of swimming in Boca Raton and one came up to us and swam with us, but that was a long time ago--when I had money and good health. I am struggling to get back to that state, and a good retirement seems to require an awful lot of money or inherited safety factors, along with strong social support and it seems easier with a good marriage of long duration, minus health challenges over the course of a lifetime.

    So many interesting angles on this question, and thank you all!

  10. #40
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    I am struggling to get back to that state, and a good retirement seems to require an awful lot of money or inherited safety factors
    I don't think it's always a lot of money, for some it's more a risk they are willing to take even if they know it's risky (and that leaves out the people simply forced out, 62 is when most people start collecting SS and there is a reason - physical labor often physically can't do it anymore, and even white collar labor can hit age discrimination). But sure it makes sense for some to wait until Medicare kicks in etc. - I mean if one can't afford healthcare until that point that's a bit more risk than many want to willingly take if they aren't forced out.

    along with strong social support and it seems easier with a good marriage of long duration, minus health challenges over the course of a lifetime.
    a good marriage is social support but I suspect in many people's cases it's more than that and their partner earns a decent middle class living and so it helps financially. I'm really not with a partner that is necessarily ever going to earn such money, so more skating above poverty, but hey they support themselves and I do when I can (ha but I'm unemployed). Good health definitely helps financially, no doubt about it.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

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