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Thread: Plastics.........

  1. #1
    Senior Member CathyA's Avatar
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    Plastics.........

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/06/

    You might have to get out and then back in this link to see this article, without subscribing.

  2. #2
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    It is a serious problem. Living on the coast, and spending a lot of time on the water, I see horrible amounts of non-biodegradeable waste cluttering up the place.

    The first three proposed overall system conditions for sustainability (by the Natural Step folks) are:

    In a sustainable society, nature is not subject to systematically increasing:

    1. concentrations of substances extracted from the earth's crust
    2. concentrations of substances produced by society
    3. degradation by physical means

    These plastics are just piling up, and they cause harm. And in today's society, it is very difficult to not contribute to the problem.

  3. #3
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Yes, I saw it on my FB page, and then read the article. It is a problem for sure.

    bae, I think you shared Natural Step before and I went back on their website. I like their proposed assumptions.

    I noticed up here in VT, people in the stores I've been going to ask, "Do you need a bag?" instead of the knee-jerk double-bag and then put one or two items in each one method that I'm used to seeing in NJ.

    But plastic is SO ubiquitous, the question becomes do we backpedal and find solutions that don't depend on plastic, or do we develop the technology to deal with it (like have Richard Branson create a new company: Virgin Space Waste Management Systems). Or creating biodegradable synthetics.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  4. #4
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    Today at graduation:
    refreshments.

    i ate some of the fruit being served directly from the plastic packaging/serving container.
    i used a plastic fork because I forgot to bring a fork - I brought it home to wash
    i used a plastic cup because the punch was pre-poured into them and i don’t drink bottled water. I threw it “away”.
    the plates and napkins were paper. I threw them “away”.

    i regretted throwing the cup “away” instead of bringing it home to wash and reuse, ideally I would also have composted the plate and napkin. Also, they were recycling the water bottles, so was that a better choice than punch? It was a bad day for me. This is one of the ongoing conversations I have with my hoarding support group. Waste is a big hoarding trigger for me. So, not saving the cup could be seen as personal progress, but it is environmentally bad, so how is that progress? Better choice - remain thirsty? Best choice, carry own cup?

  5. #5
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    Last year The Guardian had a feature on micro-fibers of plastic in the world's drinking water. 83% of samples globally were contaminated. In the US 94% of the tap water samples were contaminated at an average level of 4.8 plastic fibers per 500 ml.

    A suspected cause is laundry... washing and drying polyester clothing! Tumble driers blow fibers into the atmosphere, and washing machines pump a slurry down the drain containing fibers.

    The plastic micro fibers could be a harmless contaminant in your air and drinking water.

    P. S. It was also present in all samples of beer tested.

  6. #6
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    It is frightening the amount of plastic waste out in the world... almost over-whelming when thinking about it. I just try to bring it closer to home and have vowed not to buy any more. One step at a time, I guess.
    To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world. - Anon.

    Be nice whenever possible. It's always possible. - Dalai Lama

  7. #7
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    So, happystuff, how do you completely avoid buying plastic? What does your grocery shopping look like? That is the biggest problem for me (second is feed bags, I have no way to get feed not in plastic bags), do you buy only 100% natural fiber clothes and shoes?

    I have looked at the zerowaste sites, and find them unrealistic. A lot of it is outsourcing your waste, and some of it simply requires too much time and driving to be practical (or effective - how many gallons of gas = how many plastic bags?) where I live.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    I recycle virtually all of my plastic packaging and containers through my local recycle center and take plastic bags to be recycled back at the supermarkets. I'm still not 100% confident that these don't get dumped in the ocean or elsewhere rather than being recycled.

  9. #9
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    I'm still not 100% confident that these don't get dumped in the ocean or elsewhere rather than being recycled.
    Many of our neighbors who don't recycle cite that as their reason for not doing so.

  10. #10
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    I am no longer a staunch recycler. I've seen the local recycle collections going to the general garbage enough times to be disenchanted.

    I'm also disappointed in the financial benefit to municipalities to offer collection.

    The only thing that keeps me going is the future...

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