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Thread: How does your garden grow?

  1. #11
    Senior Member CathyA's Avatar
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    catherine........what do you do with all those tomatoes? I used to can a lot, but it got to be too much work. Plus, the USDA made processing times so long, I can't imagine any nutrients survived. Also, with my pressure canner, I always had liquid spill out of the jars and I had a hard time controlling the pressure. I freeze them all now.
    I'm still trying to decide if I should start pruning the tomato plants early on, especially the cherry tomatoes....They get so thin and leggy. I used to prune the suckers in the crotches, but stopped that.

    Anyone else still do that?

  2. #12
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    I planted that many for a couple of reasons...

    I wanted to try a few different varieties (including my hometown Rutgers varieties) to compare growth and taste. Of course, that went out the window as soon as DH offered to help me plant. He threw out the labels! I had done a detailed diagram and description in my gardening journal, and I went out to the garden when he was finished and all the tomatoes were completely scattered and nameless. Oh, well. Next year.

    I also over-planted because in NJ we had problems with deer, and I figured the more I plant, the more I'll get to salvage. So far, though, no deer! If I get too many tomatoes, I'll peel, dice, and freeze a couple of batches and give the rest to my neighbors who have been very generous with their fish catches.
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  3. #13
    Senior Member Simplemind's Avatar
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    I got my garden in very late this year because we were traveling, had some hot weather and I didn't trust my kid to water properly. Late start and all, things are looking pretty good. We just got our first crop of cherries after having moved the trees two years ago. I'm surprised the birds and squirrels left us any.

  4. #14
    Senior Member CathyA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    I planted that many for a couple of reasons...

    I wanted to try a few different varieties (including my hometown Rutgers varieties) to compare growth and taste. Of course, that went out the window as soon as DH offered to help me plant. He threw out the labels! I had done a detailed diagram and description in my gardening journal, and I went out to the garden when he was finished and all the tomatoes were completely scattered and nameless. Oh, well. Next year.

    I also over-planted because in NJ we had problems with deer, and I figured the more I plant, the more I'll get to salvage. So far, though, no deer! If I get too many tomatoes, I'll peel, dice, and freeze a couple of batches and give the rest to my neighbors who have been very generous with their fish catches.
    Oh No! Maybe you can tell by the looks of them, which ones they are? I tried different ones over the years, but ended up with just Rutgers, to simplify. I grew some heirlooms from seed one year, put them in the garden, and either the rabbits ate them, or they died of some disease. That's when I had a falling down/small chicken wire fence. Now we have a big fence, plus electric fence. So far, no bunnies, and I have too many trellises for deer to feel comfortable jumping over.

    In the summers, I love making cucumber/tomato/sweet onion/olive salads, and Danish cucumber salad. Yum! I only grow "County Fair" cucumbers because they lack the bitter gene......which means that cucumber beetles don't bother them and kill them off. It's the only way I can have cucumbers.

    I used to grow sweet corn. It was soooo yummy. But it was A LOT of work........digging a trench and planting the seeds down in it, then slowly hilling it up. Then the wind would still blow them over and we'd have to try to get them up a little. Then the coons would get them the day before I was going to pick them. Good thing we can depend on the grocery store when our gardens have problems!

  5. #15
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    [QUOTE=Tybee;300008]Since we thought we were moving, my garden this year consists of perennials and lots of herbs, as always, and vast swathes of herbs that self-seeded, mostly white sage and borage. It will be beautiful when all in bloom.

    I made a little spot and threw in some Jarradales. Everything else is what chose to come from last year. I am awash in valerian, which we are using to make tea, which is actually quite helpful.

    What are Jarradales?

  6. #16
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    I don't prune back my tomatoes.

    I put in 26 plants. 1. We make all of our salsa for the year. 2. We make ratatouille and freeze it. https://www.salon.com/2010/08/07/rat...s_grade_style/ I try to have 1 quart per week. We'll run out just as our tomatoes come on this year. 3. I cook some down for tomato sauce-some frozen some canned.
    4. Last year I gave away nearly 100 pounds to neighbors. I just walked around with a huge bowl and offered as much as they would like. Most took the entire bowl

    I waterbath can. And I've had no issues with runover-I follow the rules for how far from the top for each type of food I can.

    Love my homegrown tomatoes!

  7. #17
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    [QUOTE=frugal-one;300209]
    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    Since we thought we were moving, my garden this year consists of perennials and lots of herbs, as always, and vast swathes of herbs that self-seeded, mostly white sage and borage. It will be beautiful when all in bloom.

    I made a little spot and threw in some Jarradales. Everything else is what chose to come from last year. I am awash in valerian, which we are using to make tea, which is actually quite helpful.

    What are Jarradales?
    Sorry, I misspelled, it's Jarrahdale, a type of pumpkin, blue-ish, very pretty, and the only pumpkin I am growing this year--wow, for first time in 20 years only growing one.


  8. #18
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    I am amazed that folks in warmer climates are already getting tomatoes. Mine are at least 2 or 3 weeks out, two hybrids and three heirlooms. I try to do somethin unusual each year and this year I have six varieties of globe type peppers. Those are a couple weeks off, too. I've had a great crop of greens. I grow beets just for the greens and have spinach which is just starting to bolt, a few varieties of lettuce, and a little chard. My basil is almost ready for a pesto harvest.

  9. #19
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    I'm planning on harvesting some lettuce, chard and kale this week. But my tomatoes, like Rogar's are very far out. And my zucchini, cucumbers, and squash even moreso. All in good time.

    (DH brought home locally-grown strawberries today and they are delicious! Lots of good things happening on the island!)
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  10. #20
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Still getting craptons of green beans. Raspberries here are full out. Onions and cukes are starting, we harvested several.

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