Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Thread: Willing to work for $15-$20 an hour?

  1. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    30
    Here in New Hampshire, there's a McDonald's that's offering $20-$22 per hour for overnight shifts, full-time. Walmart is at $10/hr, full-time, with benefits--which for some people would be more attractive than your son's $15-$20 because a) Walmart would be permanent, not temporary, and b) a perception of better working conditions--outdoors vs. indoors; heat vs. AC, bugs vs. no bugs.

    I ran a quick check for landscaping jobs on our local Craigslist, and some construction and general labor jobs as well, as those would probably attract the same applicant pool. There are one or two jobs with wages in the $12-$15 range, but most are in the $15-$20 range, with a few going up to $22. I have no idea how the cost of living varies from seacoast New England to Chicago, however. But it does seem as if the wage range your son has isn't too out of line with reality.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Penns Woods
    Posts
    2,966
    I worked a job delivering controlled substances and prescription drugs in high crime neighborhoods for a measly $8.10/hr. And then cut grass and general labor on a golf course for $10/hr. Both part time no benefits. Maybe look for retired police officers or teachers?

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,842
    And I remember when rents were 600ish on a one bedroom. So sure you didn't need much back then, but that was long ago. There is a reason even minimum wage is more than $8 or $10 now here. You still can't live on it but ...

    I think most retired public service people have better things to do with their time as most of them seem to volunteer with most of it. They do get the good bennies.

    Sometimes I consider part-time for $15-$19. could I live on it? No of course I could never ever live on it. It would supplement savings to go to school and find some career that sucks less than apparently anything I've done previously (given how little value it seems to have in the market) is all. Being that well ... But the truth is I can of course try but in all likelihood I could not get it, because overly qualified and differently qualified anyway. Because jobs are not just there for the taking, there's very little that doesn't require previous experience in just that thing.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    2,074
    A lot of landscapers in my area are undocumented. If he wants to pay $15 an hour (which is already minimum wage in some places) and no benefits he may need to hire people off the books.

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,842
    yea in all likelihood it would be a job done by an undocumented person around here (the requirement to speak english might be a problem), but some places maybe not so much.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  6. #16
    Senior Member dmc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    958
    Undocumented will not work, and it’s against the law. He may just have to pay more. I was just surprised he has trouble finding someone for a starting job. But I guess the economy must be doing great. All those inner city youth must have jobs now. I know unemployment is very low.

  7. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by dmc View Post
    Undocumented will not work, and it’s against the law. He may just have to pay more. I was just surprised he has trouble finding someone for a starting job. But I guess the economy must be doing great. All those inner city youth must have jobs now. I know unemployment is very low.

    A lot of kids, both high school and college, are taking classes or doing internships or volunteering (many high schools have a volunteer requirement for graduation) during the summer. This makes holding down a job difficult.

    And those youths that aren't in school are either working already, or perhaps not wanting to work at all, at least at a manual labor job.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •