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Thread: Favorite thing about America (4th of July thread)

  1. #1
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    Favorite thing about America (4th of July thread)

    What is your favorite thing about the US of A?

    Mine: The First Amendment. May it reign supreme and be accurately emulated in all nations for all tongues to enjoy!
    “I came from a real tough neighborhood. I put my hand in some cement and felt another hand." -- Rodney Dangerfield

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    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
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    My favorite thing about America by William Smith.

    I love that the working people of my country get to take a day off and drink, eat and blow things up. I love how raw and unrefined these people are allowed to be. Multicultural and unassimilated, part of the wood that is used to stoke the fire under the so called melting pot. Mixed up but not mixed in. A symbol for other nationalities to aspire, muts, inbreds, lacking any historical cultural connections...they are a different breed, they are an American. Fifty years ago they might have been a dumb Pollack or a Guinea or Dego but now just part of the great mishmash of society. For all its obvious faults, America is still the place everyone else wants to get to. The only place I know where we have it so good that some want to build a wall to keep people out. I love this place. There is none other like it. Today represents hope for those who haven’t yet been welcomed.

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    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Nice, WS.

    So true.

    One of the things I love about America are the early Americans who risked so much to take on Great Britain. These were ordinary farmers, silversmiths, lawyers, etc. Why get involved, with so much at stake? Yet they somehow pulled it off. They didn't have fancy technology, or any transportation to speak of other than their own two feet. But they pulled it off.

    One of my favorite stories about the Revolution is the story about Henry Knox--a bookseller--taking a bunch of men, on foot, 300 miles away to Fort Ticonderoga in the winter to get 59 cannon and mortars. They walked across Lake George to do it, and at one point, one of the cannonballs fell through the ice. Did they just say, "oh, well, it's just one. We've got plenty more." No--they figured out a way to get it out of the frozen lake and soldiered on.

    We were talking about virtues in another thread: talk about courage and fortitude and patience! Think about men carrying 59 cannon 300 miles by foot in the dead of winter, and then think about people who won't walk from the car to the store if the parking spot is too far away.
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    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    My favorite thing? Maybe that we can still lampoon elected leaders openly and not be spirited away to some secret jail (so far).

    More seriously (but only a little), my favorite thing is that, presented with even just an ideal, there is nothing America could not do when its residents yoke themselves together. Create airplanes and air travel and transistors and computers; beat back fascism (when it's outside our own borders); land people on the moon (and bring them back), ... It's becoming harder to envision that as part of a future America since so many these days seem willing to take a pass on education, common sense, and facts in favor of pronouncements from tribal leaders with their own interests at heart. But I think it's still possible.
    Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome. - Booker T. Washington

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    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I like the physical beauty of it, and its diversity--both of landscape and of inhabitants.

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    I like living in a country that was founded on a set of ideas rather than bloodlines. You can return to an idea even if you stray or fall short.

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    I like the safety and optimism from living in a basically non-corrupt society. That you don't have to bribe judges, or pay cash to medical staff, or slip the zoning guy some money to get your plan passed, etc. (yes, I know there are exceptions, but ...)
    This by itself unleashes opportunities for the everyday person to be successful.

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    I like the safety and optimism from living in a basically non-corrupt society. That you don't have to bribe judges, or pay cash to medical staff, or slip the zoning guy some money to get your plan passed, etc. (yes, I know there are exceptions, but ...)
    The corruption though it exists in the upper levels, like congress etc., doesn't really trickle down into everything and every time anyone interacts with government in their day to day lives, and that's pretty important for day to day living. And even in regard to politics: it seems candidates have been killed merely running for office in Mexico in the latest election (a death toll of over 100 politicians). One really doesn't have to think so much about that here.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveinMN View Post
    My favorite thing? Maybe that we can still lampoon elected leaders openly and not be spirited away to some secret jail (so far).
    That would be called 'freedom', a concept not known in some other countries. It seems that many people today are taking the concept of freedom for granted mistakenly thinking it is something they could enjoy in every other country on earth and to that I say ‘try it’ whilst I will stay here and be thankful for the freedom to even say that.

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    I NEVER thought I would say this ... I am ashamed to be an American! The current regime’s lack of respect for so many things and people (including our allies) +++. The list is too long ... sigh. It is not a proud time in our history.

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