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Thread: Retirement date - your thoughts?

  1. #1
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    Retirement date - your thoughts?

    Hello friends, I'm puzzling over whether to try to stick it out at my job for another few years.

    Best financial scenario is if I can last another 2 years, which sounds like nothing, however:

    1. Workplace is psychologically terrible and has recently gotten even worse.

    2. Between commute and required work hours I am having an increasingly difficult time putting in the amount of workout time/self-care that I need to stay physically healthy.

    Right now I'm thinking in terms of trying to improve my attitude and trying to figure out ways not to let the job affect my health so much. If anyone has any suggestions or thoughts I would be grateful.

  2. #2
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    Have you tried counseling? Meditation?

    The job market is strong where I am. Can you get a different job? Do you receive your medical insurance through your job? If not or if you are eligible for Medicare, would that free you up for contract to hire work so you can see if you like the company before committing to them?

  3. #3
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    Two years does sound short, but I actually quit because of health reasons, about 5 years short of when I could have gotten Medicare.
    If I could go back, I would try to find another job when I had the first one. If that did not work, I would try to figure out a way to keep the job but emotionally divorce myself from it and make self care a huge priority.
    Unfortunately, counseling and meditation did not work for me in that toxic environment.

  4. #4
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    Can you strategically plan your time off to get breaks often enough to make it two years? Do you need any medical procedures that you could take care of during these two years so you could take paid (or even unpaid) medical leave?

  5. #5
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    Are they trying to make an uncomfortable environment, hoping that you will quit, rather then the possibility of firing and an age discrimination suit? Do they offer any programs/benefits like gym memberships to help keep their medical benefits costs down? (could you be enrolled where you need time to save them money)

  6. #6
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    One suggestion if you are slightly on the fence financially is to figure out the lowest income you will have to survive on and live on that amount right now. Save everything else. If you cannot do it, what are you going to do to get more income and is retirement right now possible? If there are large expenses, have you planned for them?

  7. #7
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    Two years does sound short, but I actually quit because of health reasons, about 5 years short of when I could have gotten Medicare.
    If I could go back, I would try to find another job when I had the first one. If that did not work, I would try to figure out a way to keep the job but emotionally divorce myself from it and make self care a huge priority.
    Two years is a mighty long time when you have to drag your backside into work every day because you dislike it so much. And add to that the toll it takes on your health.

    As toomuchstuff asked, is there a way you could work some exercise or some decent-sized breaks into your workday? Is there a way to change your commute to take less time or let someone else battle traffic so you can use the time the way you'd like to? Even if it costs some money to do that, it may be worth it in the long run if it lets you address your health (because if you don't have that, who cares much about the money?).

    Is there a way you could work four 10-hour days instead of five 8-hour days? Or some work you could do at home rather than sit in the office? Is job-sharing a possibility and how much would a reduction in hours affect your retirement plans?

    FWIW I was never good at the emotional divorce thing at work. For one thing, there were requirements to work extra hours or off hours to accommodate clients; for another, I was on a pager/smartphone 7x24 for when servers went down, etc. Add in time spent reading industry journals, catching up on email, etc. It was very hard for me to compartmentalize work when it -- umm -- stained my entire week's schedule and I didn't like the place anyway.

    For me, the best route was out. Yeah, I probably dinged my Social Security earnings some and I can think of lots of things I could have bought with the money I didn't make at my new job. But I'm happier and healthier and I have not spent a moment regretting that I didn't stay. It didn't get better there. I don't know which alternatives you've evaluated but I am hopeful you've got some more ideas to think about; if they don't work at least you can be more confident about whichever option you choose.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  8. #8
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    I will say my blood pressure went down 50 points when I quit, so I think in retrospect I probably did the right thing...

  9. #9
    Senior Member Simplemind's Avatar
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    I had to jump early (three years) because I couldn't take it one more second. Although it was a bit scary at first the lack of stress was a huge plus. I think it was heaven sent because within 6 months my husband ended up losing his job due to a stroke and they never would have been happy with the amount of time I would have needed to take off. I also would have had my mind on him whenever I was at work. All things considered health wise it was good for both of us. No regrets. I still keep in touch with several people and I notice when we get into conversations about the problems that continue I find myself feeling worked up and tense. I'm gone six years and it can still stress me out.

  10. #10
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    I retired when I was 36.

    I asked myself “20 years from now, when I look back, will this matter?”

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