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Thread: To Juice or Not to Juice--that is the question

  1. #11
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lmerullo View Post
    Disclaimer: not a doctor, etc...

    1. It sounds like he said juicing, but he may really mean something more along the lines of a green smoothie...all the fiber is retained.

    2. Part of the reason I think that is he also avoids dairy, fat and meat...this to me means he's following a protocol from The China Study, made internet famous in the Forks Over Knives documentary. There is scientific evidence of reduced cancer growth when a whole food, plant based diet is consumed.

    So, I don't think it's just the "juicing", but the entire lifestyle change that's helping his longevity.

    As far as buying a juicer - why? Would you use it? Do you have a strong blender that you can try first? Friend / relative from whom you could borrow? Just food for thought.

    Personally, I use a blender and drink a green smoothie about three times a week. One reason is just plain variety...I use my smoothie for breakfast, and switch it up with oatmeal or whole grain toast. I don't think I'd want to drink one daily, but I don't have the same motivators as your interviewee.
    Thanks, lmerullo,

    1) You're right--I think he meant keeping all the fiber in it, but I'm not 100%sure
    2) He avoids fat, meat and dairy because his new digestive tract: embattled with chemo and radiation, and cut up to be half the size it was, cannot tolerate them--as he said, if he has a pizza, or a filet mignon, he very swiftly vomits or it comes out the other end. Yet, I still think his self-defined nutritional protocol his helped him. And it's not that he doesn't eat any animal-based protein--but he restricts it to chicken (organic) and fish.

    I think you guys have already talked me out of adding yet another culinary trinket to my collection. For me, it would be about convenience. It gets boring chopping vegetables.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  2. #12
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Denise Minger and others have dissected the China Study to a fare-thee-well, quite entertainingly. Not the original study--which I think is pure data--but the book by T. Colin Campbell, who distorted the original message.

    I wouldn't argue that people do best on a diet of whole foods, and maybe some really do thrive on a low-protein, high veg plan--at least for a time. There are individual differences, after all. Drs. Terry Wahls and Stephen Phinney (among others) have had solid results with programs at the opposite end of the macronutrient scale.

    I think whole fruits and vegetables blended into smoothies a couple of times a week are fine; it's the juicing that I reject.

  3. #13
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    ...

    I think you guys have already talked me out of adding yet another culinary trinket to my collection. For me, it would be about convenience. It gets boring chopping vegetables.
    You have to chop them anyway to get them into the juicer. Then there's dealing with the pulp and cleanup. Bleahh.

  4. #14
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    This is ominous:

    Glycemic load and added sugars were not significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk. The risk increased with higher intakes of total sugars, fructose, and sucrose, and the association with fructose was significant when the highest and lowest quartiles were compared (relative risk: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.80; P for trend = 0.046). A significant association was found with fruit and juices intake (1.37; 1.02, 1.84; P for trend = 0.04) but not with soda intake.

    From https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/86/5/1495/4754408

  5. #15
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Just to be clear... the patient I spoke with was NOT a juicer when he got sick. He was a regular American diet guy, eating pizza, burgers, etc. He could no longer eat those things when he was recovering because his body wouldn't tolerate it, and now he's consuming some type of blended meal--not sure if it has fiber or not--in addition to lean proteins and fish. His blends include small amounts of fruit, and otherwise plants with high anti-oxidant content. And he is alive where most of his fellow sufferers are dead.

    I feel like we're on the other thread about Revelation and the virtues of belief vs unbelief. I've long come to realize that food is a highly charged emotional topic. I think the "devil can quote Scripture to suit his purpose" and the same goes for those seeking to defend meat-eating vs vegetarianism and vice versa. There are plenty of studies to support confirmation bias on both sides (provided you're not trying to justify the heath benefits of Twinkies).

    My simple rule of thumb is to eat as naturally as possible. I no longer avoid meat, but I go for low on the food chain, and I'm not afraid of fats.

    I've seen plenty of people who have lived very long lives on plant-based diets, and I refuse to demonize that choice. A variety of whole foods and a minimum of processed foods should do the trick if you want to be healthy. I"m willing to accept that people have individual needs.

    For the record, personally, I don't drink fruit juices, because of the high sugar content. But I do love my daily banana.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  6. #16
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I don't believe I've demonized anything, but I think fructose is a substance that should be used in moderation. Because it's metabolized in the liver, it can be problematic for many--especially when taken in excess.

  7. #17
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    I was so excited a few years back about getting a juicer. Spent way too much money on one, used it for a month or so, and then gave it away. My summary: lots of work for lots of sugar:-)

  8. #18
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    I juiced for a short time and the whole ordeal was more effort than I was willing to give it. My sampling of information floating around was that it was no magical practice, but I can see it making a positive health difference over the common American diet. I think green smoothies are a more reasonable alternative as long as a person watches the sugars.

  9. #19
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    Thanks for all the clarification, catherine.

    Juicer: for this particular patient, likely a boon to his health due to his unique digestive needs. For someone who can and does consume a rather healthy and varied diet, not so needed but can be another tool for variety.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    I am non-juicer (unless you count juicing your pecs, as I do push-ups regularly).

    I like to eat fruits whole, or simply sliced with a knife.
    As for veggies, I don't like them. I think of them like medicine -- you just have to take it. So I just eat them whole, often raw.
    I came from a real tough neighborhood. I put my hand in some cement and felt another hand." -- Rodney Dangerfield

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