Page 9 of 10 FirstFirst ... 78910 LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 91

Thread: Plastic plastic everywhere, challenge

  1. #81
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Suburban Midwest
    Posts
    3,077
    I’m on a gals-only diving FB group that is U.K. based. There are the usual European “let’s ban plastic” cries. Several people who are in the medical field would like to get rid of all the plastic used in health care. Really?

    There are also multiple mentions of alternatives such as bamboo toothbrushes and other options that are expensive. People of less means aren’t going to be spending $4 on a single bamboo toothbrush when you can get a multipack at Aldi for $2-3. In my limited experience, the alternatives to save plastic, energy, whatever, by those of limited means are going to be the old fashioned ways - cloth diapers, glass containers, wax paper, etc.

  2. #82
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    VT/NJ
    Posts
    8,476
    Quote Originally Posted by Tradd View Post
    I’m on a gals-only diving FB group that is U.K. based. There are the usual European “let’s ban plastic” cries. Several people who are in the medical field would like to get rid of all the plastic used in health care. Really?

    There are also multiple mentions of alternatives such as bamboo toothbrushes and other options that are expensive. People of less means aren’t going to be spending $4 on a single bamboo toothbrush when you can get a multipack at Aldi for $2-3. In my limited experience, the alternatives to save plastic, energy, whatever, by those of limited means are going to be the old fashioned ways - cloth diapers, glass containers, wax paper, etc.
    I agree that pulling back on medical plastic use would be very difficult. But we can start with the low-hanging fruit.

    Yes--plastic toothbrushes are cheaper than bamboo and some people can't afford a $4 toothbrush. But how many people is that? Can I afford a $4 toothbrush? Yes. That's why I use bamboo toothbrushes.

    I feel that resistance to plastic use is like an omnivore's reaction to a vegan wearing a leather belt. People are so quick to dismiss change unless they can prove that people have to change 100%. Baby steps are what accomplish big goals. You pick your battles. I'll allow my doctor to slip on a pair of latex gloves, and that is not at all inconsistent with my own puny desire to be more mindful of the every day choices I make.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  3. #83
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,963
    I feel that resistance to plastic use is like an omnivore's reaction to a vegan wearing a leather belt. People are so quick to dismiss change unless they can prove that people have to change 100%. Baby steps are what accomplish big goals. You pick your battles. I'll allow my doctor to slip on a pair of latex gloves, and that is not at all inconsistent with my own puny desire to be more mindful of the every day choices I make.
    amen. Ask yourself what you are willing to give up and what you aren't (well in terms of resource use in general). Keep on asking. Don't take on the guilt of being personally guilty for all that's wrong with the world, we live in MUCH larger social structures, that we only have so much stay in (especially if we are personally neither rich nor powerful, if we are then we might have more say than others).

    So for example: the car isn't something you give up because you have to commute to have any money at all, neither do you give up driving to see your friends because of what those relationships mean to you. Ok, proceed. Then ask what you are willing to give up in day to day living, keep asking, in humility, in honesty. Ha, the latex used for birth control I would even advocate people keep using if it's something they use! But anyway I'm just saying it's a path ... It's like Marie Kondo, only it really doesn't care whether you get joy from your possessions or not, but it can be asked of day to day choices, what choices we still keep, what we don't.

    I don't know what's poisoned everyone and their thinking to make it so black and white. Maybe Socrates has poisoned us all . Maybe the lawyers have. Why do all attempts to move toward better environmental responsibility read like a philosophy 101 debate: "honesty is good, but what if there are Nazis at your door and you are hiding a would be concentration camp victim and they ask about it, is honestly still the best policy?". Sheesh, we're going to have to deal with life and practical problems (and I admit they are huge) in a little more grounded way sometime and like we actually live on planet earth, and not like it is a philosophy 101 debate. The European proposal makes sense to me.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  4. #84
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    2,278
    I don't get why in this day and age most of us can't work from home. That would make cars last longer.

  5. #85
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    1,847
    Because bosses fear work from home. They think they will lose control. However research supports it as a more cost effective and efficient work model. Hopefully the times keep changing until most of us have that option.

  6. #86
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    5,657
    Because employers want to micro manage people.

  7. #87
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by jp1 View Post
    I'm reminded of a former coworker of mine. She used to refill a plastic water bottle (the purchased Dasani kind) at the water cooler by jamming the thing up against the cooler's spigot. Getting her bright red lipstick on the water cooler spigot in the process confirming to all of us what she had done. YUCK!
    About two years ago, my company replaced all the water fountains with new water fountains that have a place to set a reusable water bottle, separate from the spigot that you drink from. Water automatically streams into the bottle, and then you lift the bottle off when it is full. There is a digital counter that displays how many plastic water bottles were *not* used because of this--last time I checked, the number was around 19,500 or so.

    But this company is pretty into recycling as much as possible. We even have pens that are made of paper? cardboard? and the only plastic is the bit that actually holds the ink and a small "clicker" on the top of the pen. There's a metal spring, and a wooden clip. But mostly, it's a paperless office.

  8. #88
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Suburban Midwest
    Posts
    3,077
    I would LOVE a paperless office! We have most of the technology to do it. The thing we’re missing is the full Adobe Acrobat software - we need it to combine multiple PDF files into one, for both building invoice packets for billing customers and for customs documents. That software is expensive and they haven’t shown a willingness to pay it. Yet we go through so much paper and they won’t recycle because it’s too expensive. I take what I can for drawing paper for kids I know and use it for scrap paper in the office. But that doesn’t make much of a dent in it. I try to print only what’s necessary and that’s still a lot but required by the job.

    I buy my own pens and get refills for them. Have my own reusable cups for tea and water. I have coworkers who refuse to use reusable cups even when they are given one. They use multiple cups a day for coffee. New one each time. Makes me nuts.

  9. #89
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Suburban Midwest
    Posts
    3,077
    Just for an experiment I went grocery shopping with an eye to avoid plastic as much as possible.

    Bread - no way to get it without plastic unless I make my own, which ainít happening.

    Breakfast food - instant oatmeal in box with paper packets

    Lunchmeat - deli counter meat wrapped in plastic. No go. Plastic tubs of prepackaged OK as I will reuse the containers. Meat inside is in a bit of plastic.

    OJ - paper carton

    Milk - we have a local dairy that has half gallons in glass sold at a number of the big chains. Oberweis. $4.50 plus $1.50 deposit. The milk is so good!

    Veggies - canned instead of frozen to avoid plastic bag.

    Relish - get glass jar instead of plastic bottle

    Mustard - Grey Poupon in glass jar instead of plastic bottle of regular yellow stuff

    Yogurt - quart plastic container instead of little plastic cups

    Pasta - cardboard box rather than plastic bag

    Shampoo - JR Legetts bar shampoo

    Soap - Dr Bronnerís lavender bar. Smells so good. Any bar soap is good but this isnít wrapped in plastic.

    Vinegar - glass bottles rather than plastic

    Veggies - I was able to get loose carrots, celery. This isnít always the case.

    Peanut butter - glass jar of natural PB rather than plastic.

    Dishwasher detergent - cardboard box

    Laundry detergent - got the natural stuff in a big plastic jug. I almost always wash in cold and had major issues in the past using powder (box) before.

  10. #90
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    534
    Tradd, my friend (I don't eat meat) brings her own reusable container to the deli. They cut,weigh into a paper and then she puts into her own box and affixed the deli price label.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •