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Thread: Overdose deaths in 2017

  1. #31
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Cannabis has its problems as well according to this http://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion/canna...tion-1.4789187 article by a clinical psychologist.

    "-for roughly one in 10 people who try cannabis, one potential impact could be addiction.

    -cannabis can directly and almost immediately change your emotional state, such that your brain can become trained to respond to uncomfortable emotions with craving or a strong desire to use cannabis. Unfortunately, if a person practises coping with emotions with the use of substances, they forgo the opportunity to practise managing uncomfortable emotions in healthy ways.
    -The diagnostic criteria of cannabis use disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), one of the main psychiatric texts that is used by mental health professionals to diagnose psychiatric and addictive disorders, includes features such as repeated use resulting in a failure to fulfil major role obligations; repeated use in hazardous situations; continued use despite social/interpersonal problems; cravings; tolerance; withdrawal; use for longer periods or in larger amounts than intended; persistent desire or unsuccessful attempts to control use; a great deal of time spent in activities related to use; reduced important social, occupational, or recreational activities; and continued use despite physical or psychological problems.

    -Research shows that cannabis withdrawal is similar to nicotine withdrawal: The DSM-5 includes diagnostic criteria for cannabis withdrawal and lists possible signs as including irritability, anger, aggression, nervousness, anxiety, sleep difficulty, decreased appetite, restlessness, depressed mood and some other possible physical symptoms (e.g., abdominal pain, shakiness, sweating, fever, chills, and headache).

    -A final popular misconception I want to address is the idea that only people with an addictive personality can get addicted to cannabis. The biggest challenge with this view is the contentious status of the "addictive personality" construct. There is no scientific agreement on exactly what constitutes an addictive personality and how exactly it relates to the development of particular addictions".
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  2. #32
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    There certainly seem to be more "broken" people abroad in the present time. I used to listen to police scanners years ago, and I occasionally do now too, and the number of apparently mentally ill people brought to police attention has seemingly skyrocketed. Part of it is undoubtedly that mental health facilities have been shuttered and sustained health care is hard to come by for many. The cynic in me suspects the "let it all hang out" culture fostered by Oprah and others has played a part, but I have no proof of that.

    I'm sure people can get hooked on cannabis, like alcohol, OTC drugs, fizzy drinks, cigarettes, or anything that provides pleasure center rewards.

    My weaknesses are "shiny objects" and refined carbohydrates, so I have to keep a careful watch on those. Also books, but those are a more acceptable addiction--at least among my posse.

  3. #33
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    I have used that thought as comfort actually--that some people just aren't meant to thrive. This isn't a criticism.. it's as much to say that some plants are planted the same way at the same time and some will grow and thrive and others will wilt and die. That analogy helps me to accept certain things that are hard to accept.
    I think there's some truth to that. Some eventually find their way back through talk therapy, diet, emotional support, growing older, etc.

  4. #34
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    I think a lot of the broken-ness starts very early. I did some volunteer work recently at a local kindergarten just out of curiosity. I wanted to see if children were happy and joyful like they should be at that age since I have noted a lot of unhappy people here. One could see, even at that tender age, that more than a few were already going to have a hard time thriving - crying spells, inability to concentrate, tantrums, anxious. I clipped an article to send to my DD since she has new twins. It said that children (and I presume adults) are more likely to thrive if they start with these three things:
    1) a sense of belonging to a group - a family, friends...
    2) they need to feel they have worth/are loved
    3) they need to feel they're good at something

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkytoe View Post
    A question that's been rolling around in my mind lately is why are there so many "broken" people in this country today.
    I think there are a lot fewer broken people than during slavery or the years when this country was annihilating Native American communities, and even in the 50's when there was "the problem that has no name". We are more open now thanks to Oprah, Dr. Phil, etc. It is good that we are more open.

  6. #36
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Good point, Yppej. Our society didn't really care about broken slaves or Native Americans, etc. but that doesn't mean they didn't exist in large numbers.

  7. #37
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Isn’t it just hearing more about it?
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  8. #38
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rosarugosa View Post
    Good point, Yppej. Our society didn't really care about broken slaves or Native Americans, etc. but that doesn't mean they didn't exist in large numbers.
    In fairness, that was before our time.

    Some of us remember the civil rights struggles that seem to have to be fought all over again, in some measure, every generation.

  9. #39
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    There are hats now that say, "America Never Was Great."

    But American exceptionalism and whitewashing of history continues.

    So yes, I think it is just hearing more about it, and the self- medications evolving to be more lethal.

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