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Thread: Pulses - half cup habit challenge?

  1. #1
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Pulses - half cup habit challenge?

    A different thread had the search for info on using an inventory of pulses on hand and a link was shared to this https://pulses.org/nap/ site. I was interested as well so discovered that site's half-cup habit https://pulses.org/nap/half-cup-habit/ challenge.

    I am going to try to do this and try some of the different recipes as well. 1/2 cup at lunch or supper each day should be doable.

    What I really love about the site is that the number of servings can be varied to suit each situation and the ingredients are automatically adjusted, in the recipes that I explored anyway. I really dislike making something for six servings and having it last all week.
    Anyone want to join me? We can report on our daily or weekly success and include the actual recipe if so inclined.
    Tonight I am having 1/2 C baked beans with added sausage in homemade salsa and fresh cherry tomatoes.
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  2. #2
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Why is someone calling these “pulses?” This is not a Latin or botanical name.

    We have perfectly good terms for these: beans and legumes

    Why must we subvert a known language identifyer to something unrecognizable?

    —Iris, curmudgeon

  3. #3
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    It's a thing: "Pulses are annual crops that yield between one and 12 grains or seeds. The term “pulses” is limited to crops harvested solely as dry grains, which differentiates them from other vegetable crops that are harvested while still green."

    ETA; https://pulses.org/what-are-pulses

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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    It's a thing: "Pulses are annual crops that yield between one and 12 grains or seeds. The term “pulses” is limited to crops harvested solely as dry grains, which differentiates them from other vegetable crops that are harvested while still green."

    ETA; https://pulses.org/what-are-pulses
    fine. just—FINE!I refuse to use that silly term.

    ...Stomping off to curmudgeon land where I may cook some of the super dooper tasty beans that DH grew last year. Perhaps there are legumes in the mix but that doesnt matter to me, I will just call them “beans.”

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    So the field corn that harvested after itís all dried out - is that a pulse too? Is wheat a pulse? Wheat is dry and there are many grains on each head.

    I never use this word ...

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    Aaargh! Semantics! My late DH used to go off whenever someone said tsunami instead of tidal wave. Whatever. I prefer to focus on the message.

    I just saw this challenge idea, think it is a cool way to encourage more bean-consumption. I have been shooting for this ever since I finished my chemo, trying to upgrade my diet for faster recovery. Some things that work for me:

    1. LENTILS! No presoaking required, small and unobtrusive, they fit into many casseroles nicely in lieu of part of the ground beef. Great in tomato sauce with pasta or rice. Sloppy Joses are made of lentils used in place of burger in a Sloppy Joe sandwich (you can slowly substitute in increasing proportions if you are a beginner to bean cuisine.) I like to make the lentil-rice-onion concoction out of the middle east. I make a pot of beans when I cook breakfast, then drain & keep in refrigerator until I toss them in something or other; alternating with a pot of rice on alternate days. That way I can always micro a quick beans & rice nosh or stir fry, or whatever I feel like on the spur of the moment.

    2. Make up beans ahead of time refrigerated until wanted. White beans mash nicely in the blender with little liquid of choice, becoming a dip (with sour cream), a sandwich spread (with mayo) or a stuffing for celery (with salsa). Red/pinto beans mash nicely into refried beans (with onions & a little bacon fat, heated & seasoned with chili powder to taste), or bean-patties (mixed with breadcrumbs, & egg), or bean meat-balls (crumbs, or rice, with egg & Italian seasonng and Parmesan Cheese to taste), or even taco filling. Whenever I make a chunky tomato sauce I toss in extra beans. Not to mention mashed beans are a great fat substitute in baking.

    3. Don't forget the protein complementarity of beans with grains. I rarely make rice without some kind of beans (even soy grits, which hide nicely for bean skeptics in the rice, cooking as they do to a nice beige color). Play around with different kinds. Red lentils or yellow split peas are stunning.

    4. If all else fails, grind dry beans into a bean flour (not my idea, Peggy Layton's, but one I heartily endorse). Sift out any un-floury parts (put in chili) and use to make "instant" bean soup by stirring into cold water then bringing to a simmer, cooking & stirring occasionally until they are cooked and thickened.
    Made with chicken broth or bouillon cubes & white beans, this makes a passable mock cream of chicken soup for sipping. Made with red beans, you have "instant" refried beans without the fat.

    5. Try incorporating into various meal courses, in addition to the main dish of chili or whatever. I marinate cooked bean mixtures with some corn for a refrigerator salad; baked beans on toast with cheese sprinkled on top are a popular Brit breakfast. Tacos or burritos are easily made with mashed beans, rice and whatever else is handy and frozen for quick snacks. Toss some cooked beans atop your salad. Mix them into your stir fries. Add them to your california blend veggie mixture (or your home made broccoli-carrot concoction).

    They really are that versatile and easy to include!

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    Hi kappydell. Great ideas. Thanks for sharing!
    To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world. - Anon.

    Be nice whenever possible. It's always possible. - Dalai Lama

  8. #8
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Not to mention mashed beans are a great fat substitute in baking.
    Kappydell, glad you reminded me of this site. How do you use mashed beans in baking?
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

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    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    How do you use mashed beans in baking?
    I've used black beans in brownies- not bad but never as good as the full fat butter brownies. I can't find the exact recipe I used, but here's one I found: https://www.liveeatlearn.com/black-bean-fudge-brownies/

  10. #10
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by herbgeek View Post
    I've used black beans in brownies- not bad but never as good as the full fat butter brownies. I can't find the exact recipe I used, but here's one I found: https://www.liveeatlearn.com/black-bean-fudge-brownies/
    I've done that with black soy beans (I mostly avoid soy otherwise) and found it a perfectly acceptable substitute--but I used butter or coconut oil (don't remember which) in mine.

    Although I eat beans only occasionally, I like garbanzo beans in salads and Indian food--soaked overnight and cooked in the Instant Pot for 15 minutes or so.

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