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Thread: New job woes

  1. #1
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    New job woes

    I just started a new job, and I'm a little worried because I feel like it's not the right fit. It's part-time, and I'm really nervous I made the wrong choice. To top it off, I just got an email from another organization I was really interested in that had a part-time position available. I thought it would be perfect (if I were offered the position), because I could work at both of these jobs - the convenient, "easy" one, and the one that allows me to follow my passions, so to speak. I've been looking for a while and haven't found anything that really fit me or what I needed.

    As I ended my first day today, I thought, well, New Job's not perfect, and maybe I don't really like it, but if I get this other job, too, all will be well in my world. The thing with New Job is that it is really close, the hours are great, and the pay is really good for part-time. But it is a somewhat highly visible job, and I, being a private person, feel a bit exposed. The greater issue, though, is that it has nothing to do with my education, probably doesn't even require a degree, and is in fact in a line of work that I said I would never, no not ever, do again. Those words are indeed choking me now.

    The thing with Potential Job is that it would utilize my education nicely, and it is with a great organization that I really admire, BUT it is really far away - an hour and a half commute, one way. However, they initially stated that hours could be split between home and the office, so I thought I could make it work.

    Anyway, they sent me another email this afternoon. They said they changed the position to a full-time job, and am I still interested? I'm so incredibly disappointed about this. I was already feeling anxious about New Job, but after reading that email and the new job description, I feel positively awful. It really would have been perfect. Of course there is no guarantee that I would've been hired, but it would have been an amazing opportunity for me, personally and professionally.

    New Job kind of just fell into my lap, and I thought I should take it, due to the aforementioned good factors and the fact that not much else is available here. I was actually looking for something full-time, but like I said, this other opportunity came up in conjunction, so I thought, well... maybe I could do both. So I took New Job, and now I think I'm regretting it. If Potential Job had been full time from the beginning I would never have taken New Job.

    I don't feel like I can quit and pursue Potential Job, because it would go against my personal values, and also, for other reasons, it would reflect very poorly on me.

    Sorry that this is extremely vague, but I can't go into specifics. I guess I am just venting. I'm sort of consoling myself with the fact that I would have despised that commute. (But I probably would have moved!)
    Last edited by talula; 5-22-11 at 10:28am.

  2. #2
    Low Tech grunt iris lily's Avatar
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    As someone who has hired what--30 - 50 employees over the years I say--get out. Get out now, make the break, hack off the limb and and save yourself. We are all miserable when it's not a good fit.

  3. #3
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    OK, two things. First, although you may not feel that it's right to leave so soon after being hired, the truth is that in the first few weeks you're not usually doing that much valuable work because you're still being trained and learning the office culture--and if you do leave very quickly, they still have all the resumes from the search that resulted in hiring you. There might even be a second-choice candidate they could bring in quickly, someone who would LOVE that job. So IF you would be hired elsewhere, I don't think it would hurt your employer as much as you might think--and honestly, no one will remember you in a few months if you were there such a short time. Not to mention Iris Lily's very excellent point about the importance of a good fit. Every employer out there who has part-time staff understands that the risk of making a position part-time is that you will lose that person to a full-time job. It's actually the perfect reason if you do choose to leave.

    But I would also look more closely at Job #2. 3 hours commute time is a huge chunk out of your day and a move is a big deal. Also, the job changeability might indicate managerial flakiness or perhaps some kind of institutional issue. Maybe it's all fine, but the job that sounds perfect is the one that should get a closer look. (Because no job is perfect, and it's possible to ignore the warning signs if you get overly enthused, says the person who has done that exact thing.)

    So if it were me, I would keep Job #1, interview for Job #2, and just think hard about it. I have certainly seen in my own life plenty of cases where Door #3 was the best choice for me. (Ie, not Perfect Thing A, or Imperfect Thing B, but Different Thing C that I didn't even know about when A and B didn't work out.)

    Best of luck--I know this is a tough decision for you...

  4. #4
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    By agreeing to start the new job you have promised nothing more than that: to start work and to check out from the inside if it is a good fit for you.
    If a better chance comes along or the job doesn't work out you would not break any commitment IMHO.
    You have not committed to stay for a longer period than your notice period.

  5. #5
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    Playing devil's advocate here: You've worked one day. The first day is always difficult, and even on the jobs that I've really loved and thrived at, the first day was universally awful.

    I would give it at least a full week, then make up my mind. But if your heart is not in it, by all means quit. A bad fit is bad for everyone, and you'd do more damage to your reputation by not thriving in a position than you would by quitting right away.

    And on "Perfect job", don't be afraid to negotiate. Women as a rule, tend to accept exactly what is offered, instead of negotiating to get what would be ideal. They clearly are interested in you, and until you ask, you don't know how willing they will be to accomodate your needs. Though having done a 2 1/2 hour daily commute for a while, that job would have to have something mighty special about it for me to endure that commute.

  6. #6
    poetry_writer
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    I would apply for the job. These places that hire part time workers have to understand that folks are trying to make a living and might quit if a great full time job is offered elsewhere. I dont think that is wrong to do. I'd go for it!

  7. #7
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    I would apply. I think you'll be upset with your self if you don't see what is available. Nothing says you have to take 2nd job if offered, and nothing says you have to stay with job 1 if it isn't a good fit and job 2 is a better fit and full time.
    Float On: My "Happy Place" is on my little kayak in the coves of Table Rock Lake.

  8. #8
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    Definitely apply for the Perfect Job. You owe it to yourself to find out more, and really discover if it IS the perfect job. Do your homework and research it inside out, backwards and forwards. I speak from experience here - I'm stuck in an awful job because I didn't do my homework. You're in a great place to keep searching. You can use the free time that comes with part time work to continue your job hunt, and you can set up interviews during that time so they won't interfere with your job, and your employer won't get suspicious.

    I totally agree with those who have said that part time employers are prepared to lose employees to full time jobs.

    One more thing - give the new job a chance, too. It might turn out better than you think. You've got time, since you've still got to go through the interview process for the other one. Good luck!

  9. #9
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    Go for what you want. Get out of the not good fit one - your employer does not want a miserable employee. There is a reason that most jobs have a 90 day trial period - it's for both sides to check it out.

    Imagine yourself 5 years from now. What do you wish you would have done?

  10. #10
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    I have turned down three Potential Jobs in the past three months. (I'm in a highly specialized field and am lucky that my skills just so happen to match the "hot list" that employers have right now).

    I, like you, find it difficult to just up and quit - I like to stick things out. But more than that is the fact that I have had enough jobs to believe that none of them are actually "perfect" or even close to perfect - each has its pros and cons. I've also sunk a good chunk of change into moving down here for this job, so I'm reluctant to spend more money to move elsewhere after such a short period of time, as well as just the simple hassle of moving yet again, and to abandon what I'm doing for the sake of a "perfect job" that may (or may not) be as good as it looks.

    So my advice is this: check out Potential Job by all means, but bear in mind that the commute will be brutal (BTDT - it's tolerable if it's every other day). Also bear in mind that there will be negatives to it because there always are - figure out what they are ahead of time. Also run the numbers - will you be better off with Potential Job. Don't forget to check out your benefit package also. And find out why it's suddenly gone fulltime. Don't feel bad for quitting your New Job if Potential Job really is Perfect Job - if it's not a good fit, that's all they need to know. Wouldn't they fire you if they thought you were a bad fit?

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