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Thread: Moving to a low-cost-of-living area to retire?

  1. #21
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    Reno is surrounded by mountains and Alan did you go to Lake Tahoe?

  2. #22
    Simpleton Alan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
    Reno is surrounded by mountains and Alan did you go to Lake Tahoe?
    Yep, one of the two days there was a motorcycle day trip down to Incline Village. Now that was gorgeous!
    "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not one bit simpler." ~ Albert Einstein

  3. #23
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    Actually the states has so many beautiful places. Anywhere that there is either near lakes, rivers, ocean, mountains, forests etc. Many parts of the Midwest is beautiful as is much of the East Coast. Flat and treeless is what I don't like. Parts of NV are ugly too. The Ruby Mountains in Elko, NV are beautiful. Trumps cronies want to ruin them with fracking but so far have been stopped. We have been to Italy and Poland twice and they are pretty countries. Can't wait to see more of Europe. I might be easier to please then some) However, weather is important to me and we have very low humidity and a great climate. When I go to places with humidity it is really hard on me as I start sweating like crazy when others are not.

  4. #24
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    I knew lots of people who lived outside Austin as they could not afford the city. It involved commuting in horrible traffic to get to work or shop so that is always something to consider. We might actually return someday but it would have to be one of those smaller towns as they are indeed less expensive.

  5. #25
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    Trust me. 10s of thousands have moved to Boise for retirement. They've driven the price of homes up 30%. Californians come with cash offers by the dozens every week. Roads are clogged. Infrastructure is super tiny for the demand and growth cannot be achieved because it's way behind. It's a friggin' mess!

    It's ridiculous!

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    I would never pay more than $10,000 a year for taxes. That tax bill is the nail in the coffin for me. My taxes in Grand Isle are one third of that, and I have the same size property, and "the livin' is easy." And I'm within 30 minutes of 3 of my kids.
    Gulp! Our tax for 2 properties is barely $5k...............

  7. #27
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    What are property taxes? How do they work?
    I came from a real tough neighborhood. I put my hand in some cement and felt another hand." -- Rodney Dangerfield

  8. #28
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    What are property taxes? How do they work?
    Typically taxes paid to your town/municipality based on the value of your property (ie so many dollars of taxes per dollar of assessed value). This pays towards schools, fire, police, library etc.

  9. #29
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultralight View Post
    What are property taxes? How do they work?
    How can you be 40 years old and not know this? Sigh, ok, i am a bitch. I guess we all have to learn at some point.

    Here is how it works very generally: the municipality in which you live assigns a value to your house, say, $100,000. It then sets a tax rate, $x per $100 of assessed value. Square footage, number of bathrooms, improvements as measured by building permits and etc. serve to determine the value of the property. I cant remember our tax rate here and our city’s website is down at the moment ir blocked or something, so I can’t look it up. Sorry!

    My real estate taxes are due each December 31st. For people who have mortgages, taxes are collected as part of their monthly mortgage payment and the mortgage holder writes the check to the municipality each year.

    These real estste taxes go to support all of the local government services in your community: police, fire and emergency services, streets, libraries, schools.

    I think my tax bill for this house in the city is $3,500 ish annually. Our Hermann house is taxed st $1,000 ish. The city here is more expensive because crime and the criminal element and their families and institutions cost money.

    Some areas of the country like Catherine’s New Jersey are known for ridiculously high real estate taxes. We Midwesterners do not know what those in New Jersey do with all that freaking money, it is a mystery to us.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    How can you be 40 years old and not know this? Sigh, ok, i am a bitch. I guess we all have to learn at some point.

    Here is how it works very generally: the municipality in which you live assigns a value to your house, say, $100,000. It then sets a tax rate, $x per $100 of assessed value. Square footage, number of bathrooms, improvements as measured by building permits and etc. serve to determine the value of the property. I cant remember our tax rate here and our city’s website is down at the moment ir blocked or something, so I can’t look it up. Sorry!

    My real estate taxes are due each December 31st. For people who have mortgages, taxes are collected as part of their monthly mortgage payment and the mortgage holder writes the check to the municipality each year.

    These real estste taxes go to support all of the local government services in your community: police, fire and emergency services, streets, libraries, schools.

    I think my tax bill for this house in the city is $3,500 ish annually. Our Hermann house is taxed st $1,000 ish. The city here is more expensive because crime and the criminal element and their families and institutions cost money.

    Some areas of the country like Catherine’s New Jersey are known for ridiculously high real estate taxes. We Midwesterners do not know what those in New Jersey do with all that freaking money, it is a mystery to us.
    $3,500 a year?! So that is like paying $292 a month for rent in perpetuity.

    And I am 39. But I did not learn this stuff because my parents did not raise me to be financially literate. And I was very late in the game to teach myself financial literacy. I am learning this stuff as I go.
    I came from a real tough neighborhood. I put my hand in some cement and felt another hand." -- Rodney Dangerfield

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