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Thread: Before and After the first frost - What Do You Do?

  1. #11
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    We also take our fire pit set off the back patio and put it under the covered patio. With having astro-turf we don't have a ton to do to get ready.

  2. #12
    Simpleton Alan's Avatar
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    I don't have much to do other than purge water from the pools pump and filtration system and winterize the motorhome. Besides that I'll switch from shorts and tees to jeans and long sleeves and I'm done!
    "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not one bit simpler." ~ Albert Einstein

  3. #13
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Disconnect outdoor hoses! I made the mistake of forgetting one year and the frozen water split the pipes behind the spigots. Some years I'll cover tomatoes with a tarp and try for an extra few days of ripening. After the good frost the perennials are mostly shot. I'll start cutting back some, but wait until spring time for others. Some I leave over winter in areas where some self seeding might work out.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    Do you mean that you want to dump fresh when you were on your garden right now and let it get soft over the winter?
    IL, I'm not understanding. Please clarify? I want to learn from you.

  5. #15
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gardnr View Post
    IL, I'm not understanding. Please clarify? I want to learn from you.
    You said “green” manure.what is that?

  6. #16
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    As far as cleanup: that wont happen until bery earlt spring. Last year we had warm days in January, and I clean and milched then. The earliet this garden had ever been cleaned!

  7. #17
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    Green manure as I understand it, is ground covers like vetch or clover or oats or rye.

  8. #18
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Ok, I thought green manure meant fresh manure from animals, and fresh manure is hot. It has to cool down or soften.

  9. #19
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    I have some tender succulents to bring in, and I'll want to bring in plants or cuttings of Mona Lavender Plectranthus, since that worked well last year.
    Empty and wash out pots of other annuals.
    There will be lots of leaves to rake and shred and spread in our garden beds, but that isn't time sensitive.
    Cut back perennials.
    Disconnect & store hoses, put away hammock, swap out screens for glass in the storm doors.
    Move snow shovels to the front of the shed.
    Has anyone in a cold climate had luck bringing in lantana plants or cuttings for the winter?

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    You said “green” manure.what is that?
    Any wintering over low growth that feeds the soil. Article here: https://www.motherearthnews.com/orga...p-zmaz00amzgoe

    At a Glance: Best Crops for Special Conditions

    Tolerates Acidic Soil: bell beans, most clovers, most vetches, buckwheat
    Tolerates Alkaline Soil: alfalfa, barley, ryegrass, Sudan grass
    Tolerates Drought Conditions: alfalfa, hairy vetch, barley, cereal rye, ryegrass, Sudan grass
    Tolerates Wet Conditions: bell beans, subterranean clover, Austrian peas, mustard, oats, ryegrass
    Tolerates Shade: most clovers, hairy vetch, cereal rye, ryegrass
    Tolerates or Enjoys Heat: cowpeas, soybeans, buckwheat, Sudan grass
    Breaks Up Compacted Soil/Deep Roots: alfalfa, bell beans, most clovers, barley, buckwheat, cereal rye, kale, mustard, ryegrass
    Suppresses Weeds: most clovers, Austrian peas, field peas, soybeans, vetches, barley, buckwheat, cereal rye, oats, ryegrass, Sudan grass

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