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Thread: Rebuilding after the hurricanes

  1. #11
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    As my Mom said about WW2 in Rotterdam: "It's your home. It's what you know and what/who you love. You stay. You rebuild. You don't leave."

    I live on the edge of a big earthquake faultline. The last one was 200m northeast of here in 1983. They say the big one is coming. But I'm not leaving. If it hits, the big canal behind our house will likely flood us out 100%. Can't buy flood insurance for it-I've tried.

    Our cabin is also near the faultline. 2 summers ago we had 100s of quakes in the 3.0 vicinity. We felt them mildly. If we move 600 miles east we are in tornado country. If we move west, more faultlines. If we move south or out east, it's hurricanes. My friend in North Dakota flooded last month. The northeast gets hammered by snow/ice/bitter cold.

    What is "safe" in the USA?

  2. #12
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    We have moved enough times that I would leave if we started having one disaster after another. People in California kept building on hills that are subject to mudslides over and over. It makes no sense to me.

  3. #13
    Moderator Float On's Avatar
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    BIL and SIL outside of Bainbridge, GA lost their Pecan Farm. Apparently not a tree left standing. And it was going to be a bumper crop in a few weeks.
    Float On: My "Happy Place" is on my little kayak in the coves of Table Rock Lake.

  4. #14
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    Float, that is really sad. Is that what they do for a living?

  5. #15
    Moderator Float On's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
    Float, that is really sad. Is that what they do for a living?
    It was her travel income. He just retired and they were in MT at their hunting cabin celebrating retirement when news arrived where the hurricane was headed. They bought a few generators and hit the road for home. Their main house near town had little damage, the farm house has one tree on the house and then 18 acres of Pecans down. I'm not sure what else was planted on the farm for row crops, they leased some of it to another farm.
    Float On: My "Happy Place" is on my little kayak in the coves of Table Rock Lake.

  6. #16
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    It is indeed possible to build to withstand hurricanes, as this house shows. The question, though, is cost. And what to do with all the existing homes that were built to a lesser spec.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/u...ach-house.html

  7. #17
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp1 View Post
    It is indeed possible to build to withstand hurricanes, as this house shows. The question, though, is cost. And what to do with all the existing homes that were built to a lesser spec.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/u...ach-house.html
    And I was just coming here to post this same article!

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp1 View Post
    It is indeed possible to build to withstand hurricanes, as this house shows. The question, though, is cost. And what to do with all the existing homes that were built to a lesser spec.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/u...ach-house.html
    A couple of years ago I was in Galveston. It was only a year or two after their last severe hurricane (can't remember the name) and the damage from that one still hadn't been fully cleaned up. Walking down the beach past the seawall, I was astonished to see brand new houses being built, literally 50 yards from the water's edge.

    Hope springs eternal. I guess the people building those houses are hoping theirs is going to be like that one in the Times, still standing while everything around it is a pile of wreckage.

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