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Thread: Consumerism for a good reason

  1. #11
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    I have one son that I always give Amazon gift cards to. He said he's happiest with that, loves them--he has used them to buy new sneakers, for example. He tends to hang on to them for a long time and them buys something he needs. He's very frugal and minimalist however, so the gift fits him well.

  2. #12
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    I donate to animal shelters and homeless shelters. I give money but I also give scarves that I make to the homeless. I see people wearing them when I volunteer. So I know that they are used. People get to pick the scarf they want so not passed out. I also donate food to food drives. I always give to the Salvation Army as they do good work with tiny salaries. I had no clue there were extreme couponing shows. It takes a ton of time to coupon like that.

  3. #13
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    Sometimes I understand the need to throw out things. Food that has not been properly stored or given, bedding/fabric items due to bed bugs, etc. My mom's apartment community finally had to close down their little thrift shop due to the fear of bed bugs.

    I dont understand the towels from an animal shelter being thrown out unless they were used by their Parvo pups. It is so contagious that they may just be cautious. But if they could be use, there are lists of shelters that would welcome bedding and that have the facilities to wash it. Our shelters use the bedding until is really is rags. Our shelter once got a box truck of linens from some kind of hospital or nursing home. Very welcome and came washed.

  4. #14
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    Our shelters have a bunch of washers and dryers and keep towels and blankets for the animals until they are rags.

  5. #15
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweetana3 View Post

    ...I dont understand the towels from an animal shelter being thrown out unless they were used by their Parvo pups. It is so contagious that they may just be cautious. But if they could be use, there are lists of shelters that would welcome bedding and that have the facilities to wash it. Our shelters use the bedding until is really is rags. Our shelter once got a box truck of linens from some kind of hospital or nursing home. Very welcome and came washed.
    I talked to the shelter manager about their towels, not because they were thrown out, because they were in the wrong dumpster. These towels were in the recycle dumpster and they do not belong there. He didnít admit to putting them in. He was vague about it, and I assured him I donít care if heís throwing them out I just want things to be sorted correctly in our dumpsters. We had a brief talk about donations the shelter gets and how he hast to keep them cleaned out, not just towels. For more than a decade, several Vari-Kennels ( dog crates) were piled outside of the shelter, but since they were in a hidden corner they were not unsightly so I didnít complain about it. And then one day when I needed one for a rescue dog I took it and have since passed it on to another rescue dog.

    This is not a conventional shelter it is a small commercial building that was the very first building owned by Stray Rescue of St. Louis and they had only about six dogs there in recent years. They have since grown very large and have a large facility downtown. They were kinda good/Kinda not good neighbors in that we had pitbull patrol on my block for decades and that was a pretty cool thing as the volunteers walk these dogs. They didnt keep up their building, tho, and that sucked.

    Anyway, Stray Rescue sold this building recently, and all dogs are gone.

  6. #16
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    An example: I had a 20% discount on regular sale items at a local chain store. I also happened to have collected enough points at this same store for a $5 credit. I saw a pair of men's flannel pajama pants for $10, which, by using my discount and credit, I bought for only $3. I then donated them to the foster teen clothing drive. I wouldn't have paid the $10 full price, but at $3 they were practically free.
    It was just something I stumbled on, but for those super shoppers who love bargain hunting as a serious hobby, it seems like it would be a great match.

    I do get the point about donating a physical thing vs. cash and how it can make us feel a more direct connection.

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