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Thread: Is there any good news on the environment?

  1. #21
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    Many things seem to be in shambles, or maybe at this point in time with communication being what it is, we hear and see a lot more than ever before. Yes it would be good to see positive change faster, but I guess to take everyone along means, adjusting to a slower pace. One good thing is the increasing awareness about the environment in younger children. Catching them young can work brilliantly well!

  2. #22
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Forbes weighs in in favor of the Green New Deal, or at least the economics behind it:
    https://tinyurl.com/y9gwwfz7

  3. #23
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    Forbes weighs in in favor of the Green New Deal, or at least the economics behind it:
    https://tinyurl.com/y9gwwfz7
    Great article. Thanks for posting.

    BTW, I've already joined the Sunrise Movement.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  4. #24
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    On the issue of climate change, I don't think we will be hearing any good news for at least the next few centuries, and that is only if changes are made NOW to stop further pollution before it's really too late. Too many natural systems are past their tipping points, and it will take, at a minimum, hundreds of years before it starts to swing back in the right direction. Every credible study coming out on climate change just shows that it is happening more rapidly than predicted, and having unforeseen (as well as foreseen) consequences in the here and now.

    But two "good news" stories from the past year that come to mind, are that the hole in the ozone layer is nearly healed. (Which for anyone not up on the science, is completely unrelated to climate change, but was once a serious threat in it's own right.) And this story: https://www.care2.com/causes/sea-tur...-20-years.html about a grassroots effort by locals to clean up what was once known as "the world's dirtiest beach" being so successful that sea turtles returned to nest there. It really shows what ordinary people can accomplish on the local level if they have the will to do so.

    I would also count the EU banning neonicotinoids as good news of a sort, even though it remains to be seen whether it was done in time.
    The more you know, the less you need.

  5. #25
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    More bad news--from the WSJ: "Farms, More Productive Than Ever, Are Poisoning Drinking Water in Rural America."

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/farms-m...5oKOIPJYssAgXg
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  6. #26
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    More bad news--from the WSJ: "Farms, More Productive Than Ever, Are Poisoning Drinking Water in Rural America."

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/farms-m...5oKOIPJYssAgXg
    this is news? Agri chemicals in the water table has been old news for a while.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Trying to stay on the positive vane,

    "Move over, almond and soy milk: An oat milk boom, as I argued in a piece last year, could help the Midwest solve some of its most dire agricultural issues. And now there’s new research out this month to help support the case for covering the region with oats."

    https://www.motherjones.com/food/2019/01/oat-milk-alfalfa-cover-crop-corn-soybeans-algae-blooms-iowa-nitrogen/

    The majority of mono culture in the corn belt Midwest goes to biofuels, high fructose corn syrup, and animal feed. It's extremely inefficient at feeding people. That is a rather sad state in my opinion and numerous improvement angles including the way people eat.

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