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Thread: What are you reading 2019?

  1. #121
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    I like Horror if it is well done.

    I think I read a couple recommended by you, The Chalkman was one of them, another one was The Boy Who Drew Monsters.

    And I hate to admit this, but I have never read a David Foster Wallace book. I can’t believe I’m saying that I aloud, it is embarrassing.
    I did recommend The Boy Who Drew Monsters, but not The Chalkman; I never read it. I've also never heard of David Foster Wallace, so I have a couple of new additions to my ever-growing list.

  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by rosarugosa View Post
    I did recommend The Boy Who Drew Monsters, but not The Chalkman; I never read it. I've also never heard of David Foster Wallace, so I have a couple of new additions to my ever-growing list.
    I tried “Infinite Jest” a few years ago, but couldn’t finish it. I sort of class DFW with Thomas Pynchon as one of those too-dense-for-pleasure-reading authors. It could be I’m just lazy.

  3. #123
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    I guess there is good reason I haven’t read David Foster Wallace.


    I’m trying to think of the guy who wrote that big important fiction book about 1978. I was thinking it was David Foster Wallace, but no it was not because I looked up Wallace’s works and it was before .Wallace came on the scene. It was a literary accomplishment and everyone in my lower class was reading it and everyone agreed he was going to be a great author.

    It will come to me. But anyway, it’s that guy that I have to read more of and I can’t remember if I actually read that first important novel of his or not.
    edited to add:
    It was Confederacy of Dunces, a 1981 novel published a decade after author’s death. His name was John Kennedy Toole.
    Last edited by iris lilies; 8-13-19 at 6:35pm.

  4. #124
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    I loved Confederacy of Dunces. It is my favorite BIL's all-time most favorite book in the world, and was an instant bonding point for us when we met back in 2000 (in addition to our mutual affection for DSIL).
    LDAHL: I might go one step lazier and not even attempt it based on your input.

  5. #125
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    I have started:

    The Stone Diaries
    Pope Joan
    Hole in My Life
    A Simple Plan

    I'm also reading this month's National Geographic on migration

  6. #126
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Yppej: Please let me know what you think of The Simple Plan. That is on my list after reading The Ruins.

  7. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    I guess there is good reason I haven’t read David Foster Wallace.


    I’m trying to think of the guy who wrote that big important fiction book about 1978. I was thinking it was David Foster Wallace, but no it was not because I looked up Wallace’s works and it was before .Wallace came on the scene. It was a literary accomplishment and everyone in my lower class was reading it and everyone agreed he was going to be a great author.

    It will come to me. But anyway, it’s that guy that I have to read more of and I can’t remember if I actually read that first important novel of his or not.
    edited to add:
    It was Confederacy of Dunces, a 1981 novel published a decade after author’s death. His name was John Kennedy Toole.
    Many’s the time I have referred to something as “an egregious insult to good taste”.

    I also would never have read “The Consolation of Philosophy” if it weren’t for that novel.

  8. #128
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    Radical Homemakers.....I'm halfway. I recommend mostly for the historical perspective of Part 1. It describes how our culture "evolved" to the state of the 90s.

  9. #129
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rosarugosa View Post
    Yppej: Please let me know what you think of The Simple Plan. That is on my list after reading The Ruins.
    I saw the movie, which was great. I'm sure the book has to be even better, as I've hardly ever seen a movie that was better than the book.

    I just finished reading Joyce Carol Oates' A Widow's Story. I have always loved her. I read Them back in the 70s, I met her soon after I moved to NJ, when she was promoting American Appetites at Brentano's in Princeton--and I (and my kids) were the ONLY ones that went to see her!!! So I was able to talk to her for a little while. We Were the Mulvaneys is also a very special book to me.

    A Widow's Story is different in that it's kind of a memoir--it's a personal exploration of the grief she felt after her husband of 47 years died unexpectedly. Not only was it a compelling read, as are many of her books, but I felt such a kinship because she described all the Princeton-area places I've lived in, near or with. She talks about Princeton Medical Center--and I think about my daughter being born in the ambulance outside that hospital's ER. She talks about Pennington Market, and I recall going there for lunch often when I worked as a temp in town. The local context made the story even more real for me.

    A very personal book.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  10. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by rosarugosa View Post
    Yppej: Please let me know what you think of The Simple Plan. That is on my list after reading The Ruins.
    It is not what I usually read but I like it.

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