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Thread: Left my soul sucking job

  1. #1
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    Left my soul sucking job

    I took a leap off the cliff this week.I couldn't take one more day at the job I was at. It was crushing me. I tried and tried, but in the end took a leap of faith that something has to change and change is good and I can do this. (I tried to get something set up before leaving but things got worse). I'm years from retirement age. At least 5 years away and I just bought a house; I'm not married or attached, so I have to work and work soon. Here's my question. When you leave a job, because you are so deeply unhappy, what do you say in new job interviews when asked why you left your former employer? This one always stumps me, because I am inherently honest and lie badly. What is the most professional, appropriate way to explain to an potential employer why you left the previous one?

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    If true I would say you were ready for a new challenge, being specific as to what the job you applied to offers in terms of responsibilities that the old one did not, and you did not have the opportunity to take time off for interviews at your previous position so you resigned to have the chance to pursue your dream job.

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    Y, that’s great advice.

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    When I interview nurses, it doesnít bother me if they mention that they donít like the negative culture at their prior job. What I donít like is if every example they give to answer other questions s involves complaining about their prior job,

    So I think mentioning it once, as to why you resigned, would be ok. Just donít return to that theme during the rest of the interview. Use positive examples from work for the rest of the interview.

    If you are looking for work in the same field and area, the people interviewing you probably already the reputations of their competitors. I know that info for all psychiatric hospitals in the Phoenix area, so when someone references it briefly it doesnít make them look bad to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tammy View Post
    When I interview nurses, it doesnít bother me if they mention that they donít like the negative culture at their prior job. What I donít like is if every example they give to answer other questions s involves complaining about their prior job,

    So I think mentioning it once, as to why you resigned, would be ok. Just donít return to that theme during the rest of the interview. Use positive examples from work for the rest of the interview.

    If you are looking for work in the same field and area, the people interviewing you probably already the reputations of their competitors. I know that info for all psychiatric hospitals in the Phoenix area, so when someone references it briefly it doesnít make them look bad to me.

    I think this is more helpful to me in the long run. I'm looking for a job and it's kind of hard to describe anything I've been applying for as a dream job. I think it's appropriate to say I'm looking for new challenges in my work career though. I just don't want to dwell on it or draw attention to it, because it can look bad. A common interview question I've run into is "Have you ever had a difficult situation at work or with a coworker and how did you handle it?" So, I'm treading carefully.

  6. #6
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    All good advice here. You were ready for a change and it wasn't going to happen where you were; it became a fit that was not good; it's time to find a new challenge because you really want to <fill in next step of career>. Be professional about not badmouthing the culture where you were; as Tammy said, some workplaces' reputations precede them.

    And good luck! I hope the next job renews your spirit. Going to work every day and hating it stinks, bigly.
    Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome. - Booker T. Washington

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiam View Post
    I took a leap off the cliff this week.I couldn't take one more day at the job I was at. It was crushing me. I tried and tried, but in the end took a leap of faith that something has to change and change is good and I can do this. (I tried to get something set up before leaving but things got worse). I'm years from retirement age. At least 5 years away and I just bought a house; I'm not married or attached, so I have to work and work soon. Here's my question. When you leave a job, because you are so deeply unhappy, what do you say in new job interviews when asked why you left your former employer? This one always stumps me, because I am inherently honest and lie badly. What is the most professional, appropriate way to explain to an potential employer why you left the previous one?
    I'm ready for a change and new/exciting possibilities with a new company.

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    In the process of getting my current job I developed some standard good answers. One was that I wanted more contact directly with children because my last position had become more and more administrative over the years. I was still employed so another question was about contacting my current supervisor, so I said that I didn't want to alert him that I was looking. At one point they asked me directly if I was going to earn less money and was that okay. I responded that I had side projects that i did not have time for, like teaching crochet. I wanted to devote some energy there and together I would make the same or more money.

    I think that you have good advice here, most hiring managers will understand that many workplaces suck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gardnr View Post
    I'm ready for a change and new/exciting possibilities with a new company.
    That's better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zoe Girl View Post
    In the process of getting my current job I developed some standard good answers. One was that I wanted more contact directly with children because my last position had become more and more administrative over the years. I was still employed so another question was about contacting my current supervisor, so I said that I didn't want to alert him that I was looking. At one point they asked me directly if I was going to earn less money and was that okay. I responded that I had side projects that i did not have time for, like teaching crochet. I wanted to devote some energy there and together I would make the same or more money.

    I think that you have good advice here, most hiring managers will understand that many workplaces suck.
    That part I think I've got. I know for a fact that I want to work with kids in a more developmental way and less in a trauma informed environment. So that's kind of easy. I've learned so much and I feel like I can apply it productively, but I've realized that my heart lies with the more developmental/educational aspect of it.

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