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Thread: Cooking stoves being unreliable

  1. #11
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    I have an induction cooktop combined with a regular electric oven. Never having had a gas stove, I was apprehensive so went electric.
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  2. #12
    Senior Member HappyHiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by razz View Post
    I have an induction cooktop combined with a regular electric oven. Never having had a gas stove, I was apprehensive so went electric.
    Pls. let us know how it goes--may it--and you--live long and prosper...

    Regarding those coil burner stoves...one caveat...I do have less than fond memories of cleaning the burnt spills on the little dishes under the coils...and/or wrapping those cachement dishes with foil that then got burned on.

    I see you can buy disposable little foil catchers to put under the coils but I hate the idea of throw-away items that have to be constantly replaced...

    Maybe I'll turn to a raw diet and never cook again...problem solved!!
    Author of the green eco-thriller: Falling Through Time http://fallingthroughtime.com Editor of http://vibrantvillage.com

  3. #13
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    I miss my 30 year old gas Kenmore stove. This house has a smooth top electric and I DO NOT like it at all. One burner is definitely hotter than the others. I think the unit is about 5 years old.

  4. #14
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkytoe View Post
    I miss my 30 year old gas Kenmore stove. This house has a smooth top electric and I DO NOT like it at all. One burner is definitely hotter than the others. I think the unit is about 5 years old.
    I believe that today's stove is designed that one burner is supposed to be hotter or so I have been told.

    My induction cooktop has 2 small, i medium ( I use it the most), 1 large burner and one small keep warm. They all work well but do have different speeds of cooking which took a little while to get used to.
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  5. #15
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    We Have a smooth top glass stove in our weekend house in Hermann. I much prefer gas, but this stove is,well, OK. Is bearable. Just two days ago I cooked fried chicken and I burnt it so I DH we are having “blackened chicken” but he knew what happened!

  6. #16
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    Appliance manufacturers used to do just fine constructing products that lasted. It would be interesting to see what changed; I'm thinking shareholders are involved.
    They are. It's hard to keep increasing sales when your customers buy from you only every 20 years or so...

    In fairness, though, appliances today also generally are much more efficient than the appliances of yesteryear. Those old KitchenAid/Hobart dishwashers that lasted 30-40 years could barely wet down the dishes with the water a modern efficient dishwasher uses (3-4 gallons for an entire cycle). Refrigerators are better-insulated and the compressors far more efficient, so they use far less electricity than the overbuilt ones many people use in their basements or garages. Appliances are not designed with as much "margin" as they used to be, which has kept purchasing and operating costs down (except for the fact that they last a third as long as they used to).
    Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome. - Booker T. Washington

  7. #17
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    Old gas stoves also have permanent pilot, I have one of those. Since it's literally permanently burning a pilot light it wastes natural gas (always) and generates excess heat in summer (which I then run more AC to cool). So there is that. But it came with the apartment and unless it died why would I replace it.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  8. #18
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    I hate electric stoves. I find it much easier to cook with gas

  9. #19
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
    I hate electric stoves. I find it much easier to cook with gas
    In our renovated kitchen, we will have a gas stove. We have gas in the house.

  10. #20
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Electricity has always worked perfectly well for me, but I'm in no way an accomplished cook. Induction may be an enhancement.

    I've had gas heat, but I'd rather not. Too many things blowing up around here; Seattle had a gas leak and subsequent explosion in the Greenwood neighborhood and we've had a pipeline explosion or two. It's an unlikely risk, but real enough for me. Not to mention electricity isn't going to give off carbon monoxide.

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