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Thread: Willoughby......

  1. #21
    Senior Member gimmethesimplelife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    ...But zealots can be insufferable...

    My mother always thought Ralph Nader would be a good match for me (why do you hate me, Mom?)
    Ralph Nader? Was he over the top in some way? I'm familiar with the name, wasn't he the one who wrote about the Chevrolet Corvair being unsafe at any speed? Sort of like a consumer rights advocate, something along the lines of the role I fill online at times - of course I don't have the household name and cachet that the Ralph Nader name does. I remember when Ross Perot was running for President there was some mention of Ralph Nader's name but I don't remember the context.....Rob

  2. #22
    Senior Member gimmethesimplelife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    I wonder how receptive most men would be to the infantilization that comes with the Komen Foundation and their much-ballyhooed "cancer cures." I think not much. My beloved wouldn't have given a second look to such a thing. BTW, I believe it was a new, untested drug that ultimately took his life; be careful what you wish for.

    Milo Y is a persona non grata nearly everywhere on earth at this point. Like many of his ilk, he seems to have unlimited amounts of hatred to spread around.

    You have considerable passion; the world would be a better place if you'd find a positive outlet for it.
    I've heard that Milo still has audiences eager to listen to him, but has been banned from other arenas, so yes, he's not welcome everywhere. He has a controversial message - as far as I am concerned, this is to be expected, especially in a liberal academic setting. Rob

    PS For what's it's worth, I'm sorry about the loss of your SO. That sucks......Rob

  3. #23
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gimmethesimplelife View Post
    ...

    PS For what's it's worth, I'm sorry about the loss of your SO. That sucks......Rob
    I scold him every day for leaving me alone, but he lived a long life and he's out of the clutches of doctors and diseases now.

    He paid alimony for many years; he could have been a bitter man. But what would have been the point? Besides, he had me.

    Ralph Nader was a passionate, dedicated consumer advocate. Ross Perot was a politician my parents voted for.

  4. #24
    Senior Member gimmethesimplelife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    I scold him every day for leaving me alone, but he lived a long life and he's out of the clutches of doctors and diseases now.

    He paid alimony for many years; he could have been a bitter man. But what would have been the point? Besides, he had me.

    Ralph Nader was a passionate, dedicated consumer advocate. Ross Perot was a politician my parents voted for.
    Jane, again not to change the subject, but I noticed your use of was - past tense - in the case of both Ralph Nader and Ross Perot. So I googled. Both men are in their 80's and still with us on this rock we call Earth. I'm going to guess both are mostly retired and out of the public sphere, but both are indeed still with us. Rob

  5. #25
    Senior Member gimmethesimplelife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    I scold him every day for leaving me alone, but he lived a long life and he's out of the clutches of doctors and diseases now.

    He paid alimony for many years; he could have been a bitter man. But what would have been the point? Besides, he had me.

    Ralph Nader was a passionate, dedicated consumer advocate. Ross Perot was a politician my parents voted for.
    That's a very beautiful take on his death. I mean this - very human, very humane, very mature. I can see your point, too. When the friend of my family, John Kuo, passed in 2012 it was hard for me. He is someone who'd always been so kind to both me and my Mother and he had late stage Parkinson's along with other health issues including dementia.....he was definitely in the clutches of doctors and diseases as you say. It took me a few years but I came to understand that he had a fairly long life and was free of doctors and diseases with his passing. And I hope this doesn't sound horrible, but if he had to go I'm glad it was a massive stroke. I'm told it was quick and painless. I still remember the day I got the call from the assisted living center regarding his stroke - I didn't have insurance at the time and was on a Greyhound going 75 MPH towards Calexico, California to cross the border into Mexicali for an affordable ultrasound. Unable to be on the ground in Phoenix being of comfort or assistance for what needed to be done. But once again, I'm glad he's free of doctors and diseases like your SO is now. Rob

  6. #26
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gimmethesimplelife View Post
    Jane, again not to change the subject, but I noticed your use of was - past tense - in the case of both Ralph Nader and Ross Perot. So I googled. Both men are in their 80's and still with us on this rock we call Earth. I'm going to guess both are mostly retired and out of the public sphere, but both are indeed still with us. Rob
    I was thinking they were retired from public life. I'm happy they're still kicking.

  7. #27
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    Ralph Nader is not retired from public life, he has a radio show. And this at 85.

    ---

    As for women the things they are said to want could not even exist in the same person, women alternatively want Prince Charming, and also can not stand being single and are absolutely desperate not to be. May as well just drop the generalizations altogether at this point.

    Once the typical man wakes up to these issues, he's not going to care what anyone thinks of his being partner free or what anyone thinks of his life choices/how he deems fit to conduct his life. Such makes it easier for men to be alone.
    I've always lived by this, otoh many people have a lot of pressure from family etc. (which can be loving, but can get too much, family pressures may be entirely selfish - if all they care about is grandchildren or something - which noone is owed, but are often with a persons welfare in mind).
    Last edited by ApatheticNoMore; 4-14-19 at 2:24am.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  8. #28
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    You have considerable passion; the world would be a better place if you'd find a positive outlet for it.
    This.

    How does adopting someone else's anger and outrage make your life better or the world better? Are you adopting this anger just so you can be accepted by these old high school acquaintances? If you didn't share their outrage, would they still be "nice" to you? I fail to see how a bunch of bitter men complaining about how they got screwed over by their ex wives is "activism."

    Everyone has their hurts in life, no one is exempt. One side doesn't have it better. Have you ever heard someone with a grievance acknowledge that they too contributed to the situation? I bet never. You only hear how wronged they were.

    There's a lot of unfairness in the world, in this country and in your neighborhood. Just stewing in hatred and bitterness does nothing positive.

  9. #29
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I've considered myself a feminist since I first heard the term. There are many "flavors" of feminism extant; one of them is "victim feminism" (which I suspect is not what adherents themselves call it.) This flavor serves its purpose, which is to get people riled up and active in fighting perceived--often real-- injustices. I see victim feminists as analogous to men's rights advocates--doing important work, but not a group I'd care to be associated with.

    Like many women, I've been groped, insulted, cat-called, assaulted, ignored, condescended to, etc. But I can't imagine forming my identity around victimhood, nor sitting around recounting my grievances ad nauseum. Like herbgeek said, there's plenty of hurt to go around, if that's what you want to marinate in, but doing so is unlikely to make you a better or happier person.

  10. #30
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post

    ...But I can't imagine forming my identity around victimhood, nor sitting around recounting my grievances ad nauseum. Like herbgeek said, there's plenty of hurt to go around, if that's what you want to marinate in, but doing so is unlikely to make you a better or happier person.
    I dont think you understand the Rob is sacrificing his happiness and personal betterment on the alter of Truth Telling. We should be thankful for his “activism” because he means it for our own good.

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