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Thread: Coco Coir?

  1. #1
    Senior Member CathyA's Avatar
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    Coco Coir?

    Anybody use this in their gardens or containers?
    It seems to be the big thing now. It seems like a good idea to use the ground up coconut shells, to be a replacement for peat, since the peat bogs are being ruined.

    I'm trying to find a brand that is organic and certified by OMRI (Organic Materials Review Institute). Just when I think I've picked a good one out, I read a couple horrible reviews of it.
    I guess that's the way it is with all reviews, but it's disconcerting........especially if I'm going to put this into my garden veggie stock tanks, where I use my own compost. I think it's best quality is that it retains moisture.
    When I got these big stock tanks, I drilled way too many holes in the bottoms, and they lose water too quickly. Filling all those holes has been a challenge.
    Anyhow......anyone use much of this coir?
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Cathy, can you empty the tanks, lay thick plastic sheets down with fewer holes to reduce the water loss?
    As far as the coir question, my favourite garden centre has very small bales of them that is supposed to be the equivalent of a 3 cu ft for $13.99. I am not paying that much. I bought some peat recently and the 3 cu ft size was $6.77. Double the price!
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  3. #3
    Senior Member CathyA's Avatar
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    Thanks razz. I don't like mixing plastic with my veggies.....maybe I shouldn't worry about that....but hey, I have to worry about something, right?
    But if I could find some plastic that was more "food safe" (if there is such a thing), that would be a great idea! I can't believe I put so many 1" holes in them. I thought I was doing a
    good thing.

    I'm trying to avoid ever using peat moss, since it destroys some wonderful, natural peat bogs, which are natural sinks for CO2. I've read that Ireland is starting to close off their bogs to industry, realizing that they are so important to the environment. The coconut coir is just a cast-off from the coconut industry, so I think it's much better for the environment. I'd like to try the coir first, instead of plastic.
    Thanks!

  4. #4
    Moderator Float On's Avatar
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    CathyA, do you have broken terracotta pots? I always put those over holes to slow the loss of water. Over time they tend to break down and have created flat layers.
    Float On: My "Happy Place" is on my little kayak in the coves of Table Rock Lake.

  5. #5
    Senior Member CathyA's Avatar
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    Hi Float On. Yes, I have some of those! I'll give that a try. I have 2 50 gallon stock tanks and 7 70 gallon tanks. So many holes!

  6. #6
    Moderator Float On's Avatar
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    Course that means emptying and refilling. I wonder if you could stick something under the tanks to slow. Are they on solid bases or open to air? I remember when you set them up but can't remember if you did sawhorse style or framed style. Old shingles tucked under could slow it too just make sure they are organic shingles (apparently that's a thing... we're getting bids for new roof on the old glass studio).
    Float On: My "Happy Place" is on my little kayak in the coves of Table Rock Lake.

  7. #7
    Senior Member CathyA's Avatar
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    Hi Float On. They are open to air, since they are on 3 cement blocks each. What I've been trying to do is either from the bottom, twist in a PVC plug, or dig out some of the soil in the stock tank and put a plug in that way. The PVC plugs don't always fit, so in some of the holes, from the top, I find branches that are the right size and wedge of them in the holes.
    Another reason to slow the water out the bottom is that it makes the soil wet under it, and that attracts worms, etc., and that attracts moles. They've dug channels all over the place and made some of the stock tanks lean. We've had to jack up a few. This didn't turn out exactly the way I had hoped. hahaha

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    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    CathyA: Why are PVC plugs better than a plastic liner? Just wondering. I bet you could use some type of putty or polymer. Something like this might work: https://www.amazon.com/Sugru-Moldabl...s%2C166&sr=8-3

  9. #9
    Senior Member CathyA's Avatar
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    Hi rosarugosa. I guess I was trying to use something that wasn't toxic. The PVC plugs are used in water lines, so I thought that might be okay. To line the tanks with plastic would just be more plastic in there than I'd want. I'll check into the putty-type things like in your link. surely there are some that are less toxic than others. Similar to what Float On suggested, I could even use little stones to partially obstruct the holes. I just now thought of that. These tanks are about 6-7' long and I put about about 7-10 1" holes in them all. How stupid was that? At the time I thought I was doing the right thing. Thanks for your suggestion. But now that I just thought of it, I think I'll go with small stones to put into the holes. Water would still drain out, but hopefully not as quickly.
    Thanks again for your suggestion!

  10. #10
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    And rocks are free and easy to come by! I don't see why that wouldn't work. Good luck!

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