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  1. #1
    Senior Member Geila's Avatar
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    Calling all Gardeners!

    I need help finding flowering plants for a tricky spot. Here is the criteria:

    1. Can be grown in a container.
    2. Flowers in summer.
    3. Takes hot dry SHADE (most heat-loving plants need sun).

    Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    New Guinea impatiens. I have them in pots in the front of my house where it only gets late afternoon sun. It takes the heat ok, but you do need to keep them watered.

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    Bleeding hearts. Hostas are my preferred hot shade plants.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Geila's Avatar
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    For further context, this is for an area surrounded by lots of green, that's why I'm looking for flowers even though I do love foliage plants, especially chartreuse and maroon/red/purple foliage. The surrounding greenery is provided by golden bamboo, lemon trees, camellias, a small tree with lime green leaves and scented flowers, palm trees (queen and date palm), and a green shrub with white flowers that hummingbirds love.

    I've created a seating area and I want to put an arrangement of flowering containers next to it as a focal point where you can sit and enjoy the flowers close up. Next to the seating area, but slightly secluded, will be a small mediation area and I want to put some flower there as well. I already have some lovely small-scale statuary and garden art for the meditation area, but I think some flowers will soften it up.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Geila's Avatar
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    I'll check out the impatiens. Do they really need to be watered several times a day during hot weather? Realistically, I'd probably water a few times per week - maybe once a day at most.

    I've never grown bleeding hearts, I'll see if I can find them here. I've tried hostas before - love them - but they never survive the snails. How do you keep the snails from eating them all up?

  6. #6
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Bleeding hearts bloom only once a year, they bloom in the spring. In California I don’t even know if you can grow them, or if they would have a second bloom, don’t now.


    I guess if you have a severe snail problem I would not plant hostas. Or, you can try treating with diatomaceous earth but I don’t know how effective that is really.


    We had new guinea impatiens in pots and you definitely have to water them once a day but I don’t know about multiple times a day, that seems excessive.Regular impatiens do well in shade and produce lovely bright flowers and yes they do need watered once a day especially if they’re in a pot.


    Coleus develop good color in shade. They are not flowers but they’re certainly colorful. If you don’t know coleus there are hundreds of varieties With striking colors and patterns of leaves.

    Around here coleus and impatiens are the go to plants for color in shady places.
    Last edited by iris lilies; 6-12-19 at 11:29am.

  7. #7
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    I water the impatient every couple of days but they are in a big pot. More soil volume retains more moisture. You could also use those crystals that release water slowly.

    I don't see visible signs of stress on the New Guinea impatiens the way I do on the regular ones, which just sort of wilt.
    Last edited by herbgeek; 6-12-19 at 6:19am.

  8. #8
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by herbgeek View Post
    I water the impatient every couple of days but they are in a big pot. More soil volume retains more moisture. You could also use those crystals that release water slowly.

    I don't see visible signs of stress on the New Guinea impatiens the way I do on the regular ones, which just sort of wilt.
    Agreed, New Guinea
    Impatiens are intended for more sunny places than the regular ones, and their moisture reqirements likely less stringent. They are better looking plants over all than ithe traditional impatiens, when small anyway.

    But that said, I love my front garden full of bright red regular impatiens. I will have to water them every few days during hot dry times But that’s OK, they are so easy to grow otherwise and they provide a constant bloom.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Geila's Avatar
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    Thanks - I will seek out the New Guinea impatiens and try those out first. I do like the pops of strong color, they seem to be profuse bloomers. If that doesn't work out, or I can't find any in stock right now, I'll try some coleus. That looks like a gorgeous plant.

    Does anyone grow begonias? I've seen them grown quite a bit here in the coastal areas, there's even an annual begonia festival, but I'm further inland. I've always thought they prefer a cool wet climate but I just read that they might be okay with heat and drier soil. I'm wondering if they that might work. The last few days we've been in the 100's; our summers seem to be getting hotter. I'm in the USDA Hardiness Zone 9b, and Sunset's Western Climate Zone 15.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Geila View Post
    Does anyone grow begonias? I've seen them grown quite a bit here in the coastal areas, there's even an annual begonia festival, but I'm further inland. I've always thought they prefer a cool wet climate but I just read that they might be okay with heat and drier soil. I'm wondering if they that might work. The last few days we've been in the 100's; our summers seem to be getting hotter. I'm in the USDA Hardiness Zone 9b, and Sunset's Western Climate Zone 15.
    Tuberous begonias need moisture and stable at that. Wax begonias are more forgiving-I honestly don't care for this cultivar.

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