Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Would you buy a house that is on National Historical Registry?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    4,103

    Would you buy a house that is on National Historical Registry?

    Would you buy a house on the National Historic Registry? I know there are some restrictive things with respect to renovation, etc. A house we are looking at is on the Registry, and I wouldn't want to change anything on the outside, although I might want to restore a barn that fell down by putting one up again.

    Does anyone have experience with this?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    16,308
    Oh hell yes!

    Said out of sheer ignorance about what the restrictions are.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    9,447
    So are there restrictions on what you can do on the inside?

  4. #4
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    16,308
    I will bet you are buying a house out in the country and probably not within an established historic district. If thatís the case youíre probably safe from regulations that govern historic building restrictions. When I googled being on the National Register of Historic Places, articles mentioned there are no restrictions that come with that status.Being in a historic district is different than having your single property listed on the National Register so check on that.

    Building an historically accurate barn would use serious cash, but that likely is not required in your potential property.

    I am familiar with ordinances that govern all properties within a single historic district. Historic districts can be established by local or national action. The city of St. Louis has several historic districts, each one separately defined. A set Of ordinances Belongs to each district. That is because each district is from a different time and the code of building regulations needs to be specific to that time.

    In my city ordinances do not govern the interior of the building. However, when people use tax money to fix up their buildings in a defined historic district, it is true that they must follow requirements for appropriate interiors. Tax incentive money comes with these restrictions.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    4,103
    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    I will bet you are buying a house out in the country and probably not within an established historic district. If thatís the case youíre probably safe from regulations that govern historic building restrictions. When I googled being on the National Register of Historic Places, articles mentioned there are no restrictions that come with that status.Being in a historic district is different than having your single property listed on the National Register so check on that.

    Building an historically accurate barn would use serious cash, but that likely is not required in your potential property.

    I am familiar with ordinances that govern all properties within a single historic district. Historic districts can be established by local or national action. The city of St. Louis has several historic districts, each one separately defined. A set Of ordinances Belongs to each district. That is because each district is from a different time and the code of building regulations needs to be specific to that time.

    In my city ordinances do not govern ts not in he interior of the building. However, when people use tax money to fix up their buildings in a defined historic district, it is true that they must follow requirements for appropriate interiors. Tax incentive money comes with these restrictions.
    It's not in a historic district--it is out in the country on acreage. The barn falling down is REALLY unfortunate as it was an interesting barn and a real beauty, not sure why it fell down. I only know it did because it showed up on Google maps and then did not show up on the listing and win the satellite pic there was a big pile of rubble.

    Inside, I really would not change anything, as it is beautifully unchanged looks wise from what it originally was. It's beautiful and well kept up. I wouldn't change anything on the outside, either, now that I think of it. So not sure what I am worried about, haha.

    I sure wish it had its original barn, though.. .

  6. #6
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    11,907
    Could you reconstruct the barn? I take it all the pieces are there and there's a picture somewhere to work from.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    9,447
    Tybee, realistically how long are you guys going to be able to live there before you have to move again? The last time we moved we made sure we could age in place. We bought a small ranch in town and made the yard low maintenance. It’s expensive to move.

  8. #8
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    16,308
    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    Could you reconstruct the barn? I take it all the pieces are there and there's a picture somewhere to work from.
    Sure she could. With that billion bucks being handed out.

    seriously, that isnt likely to be a realistic project for the OP. Her finances are limited.

  9. #9
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    10,560
    I'm with IL. I would DEFINITELY consider a historic landmark building, especially if you have respect for the intention of the designation, which you do. You could consider yourself a steward of the place to keep someone else from messing with it.

    Would you be able to get a grant of some kind to restore the barn to its original glory?
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    3,158
    No, No, No. Unless I had serious!! cash for all the specific requirements and knew the specialists that might be required for the work. Even getting appropriate windows and having them repaired here for buildings in the historic distircts is a nightmare and a serious expense. There is one building I love that is disintegrating because the condo owners do not have the funds to do the work to the districts requirements.

    Love the buildings just not the regulations and serious additional expense.

    I have a non contributory modern house in a historic district and have had several serious issues with the bureaucrats and ridiculous regulations.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •