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Thread: Has politics replaced religion?

  1. #1
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Has politics replaced religion?

    The Christian Science Monitor magazine had a review of the book, " I Love you but I hate your politics: How to protect Your Intimate relationships in a Partisan World" by Jeanne Safer.
    I have not read the book but my interest was piqued. It seems that emotions run high with partisanship. How does one work through the differences? Has politics replaced religion. Religion has been used to divide and still does. Are the approaches for interactions similar for mixed religion as mixed politics?

    Jeanne is a psychotherapist in a politically mixed marriage to Richard Brookhiser, an editor at the National Review (which I had to look up) is a leading conservative magazine and website covering news, politics, current events, and culture with detailed analysis and commentary.

    Quotes:
    "Ms Safer believes by vesting so much of out identities in politics (which, she says, has largely replaced religion) we interpret another person's political differences as a rejection of who we are. We not only want to be liked, but we also want others to be like us...

    'I love you but I hate your politics' includes rules of engagement for interacting with those of a different political stripe.

    It invites readers to reexamine the fundamental nature of interpersonal bonds."

    I don't get caught up in either religion or politics leaving each to his/her own way of thinking following the Golden Rule most of the time. Curious what others think about managing the partisanship in mixed marriages of the political type.
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

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    We were together for 2 years before politics ever came up and I learned that he was a Republican. We mostly don’t discuss it. My ex and I were both liberal Democrats and he married a Republican also. I have a good friend from high school that’s a Republican and we avoid politics also. Even though my motto is I am not losing relationships because of this my newly found half sister dumped me after 2 months because I hate trump. She is English and lives in Australia but loves him. I tried to explain my philosophy to her but it ended up mattering to her.

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    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I could probably coexist with a traditional conservative (George Will, Michael Steele, etc.), but not with a "Trumper," or anyone with his worldview. I would rule out anyone who was willing to turn over the national parks to developers, or ban whole ethnic groups from immigration, for example.
    Last edited by JaneV2.0; 8-2-19 at 6:16pm.

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    My husband is traditional conservative although he is for many social programs and has lots of empathy for people.

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    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    I believe social media has replaced religion more than politics has.

    Regarding religion:

    As a "heart-Catholic" (Catholic in my heart and upbringing but lapsed in other ways) I am a big fan of Dorothy Day who was a radical in her time. She converted to Catholicism, and she started the Catholic Worker in NY which has expanded multi-nationally to communities that need help and support that the government doesn't give them. She, and Peter Maurin were supporters of Distributism, which is "an economic ideology asserting that the world's productive assets should be widely owned rather than concentrated." I also am a big fan of Pope Francis who cautions against "unfettered capitalism" and the destruction of the earth. I find it amazing that so many American Catholics disparage Pope Francis, but I believe that's because they have bought into the story of money as the eighth Gift of the Spirit.

    Our political system is so far from that, which is why I veer toward Socialism, but I don't think I'm a pure Socialist. I would like our government to protect the healthcare of our citizens, and the rights of our inhabitants to pursue an honest livelihood.

    Regarding social media:

    Social media has become our confessional, judge and jury, and I don't think that's a good thing. Peer pressure can work to enable good works or evil works, and that's what you get on social media.

    Maybe this belongs in the Spirituality forum, but I think our best selves are found when we are quiet and listen to our intuition. You may call this intuition "God" or "The Spirit" or whatever, but I believe we listen and respond best when we turn off everything--CNN, Fox, religious dogma, et.al.
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    Well we go to political things together as we don't differ that much, so if they actually liked their partners politics they could do political involvement together. So there is something to be said for compatibility (generally and in politics). Now I think even people who strongly agree politically can get into it splitting very fine political hairs, although I mostly see that online, and well it probably is harmful.

    Some people think a lot is at stake in politics if that's where this was going, and so that's why they get intense about it. Maybe it is that way with religion with a lot seen as at stake.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

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    I think politics is filling a couple of voids.

    One is affiliation. The “bowling alone” thesis. As families fracture, traditional forms of civic and social involvement decline and organized religion fades, people turn to politics for an (I think illusory) sense of belonging to a like-minded tribe. Various forms of media make it easy to self-sort in this way.

    Another is meaning. As faith, tradition and other value systems are deconstructed, demeaned and diminished, we are left with the thin gruel of politics as a substitute. We confuse ideology with morality. The self-righteousness of the Moral Majority finds new expression in call out culture.

    In the absence of stronger roots to anchor our sense of self, we can exaggerate politics to the point where we might feel it necessary to terminate relationships. I think that is very sad.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    I think politics is filling a couple of voids.

    One is affiliation. The “bowling alone” thesis. As families fracture, traditional forms of civic and social involvement decline and organized religion fades, people turn to politics for an (I think illusory) sense of belonging to a like-minded tribe. Various forms of media make it easy to self-sort in this way.

    Another is meaning. As faith, tradition and other value systems are deconstructed, demeaned and diminished, we are left with the thin gruel of politics as a substitute. We confuse ideology with morality. The self-righteousness of the Moral Majority finds new expression in call out culture.

    In the absence of stronger roots to anchor our sense of self, we can exaggerate politics to the point where we might feel it necessary to terminate relationships. I think that is very sad.
    So true. I saw this after the presidential election, where my dil cut off her parents for a while because they voted for Trump. As in would not let them see their granddaughter. She was not the only young person to do this.

    I love Catherine's line about money being the 8th gift of the Spirit. Absolutely need to ponder that one and take it out and think about it once a day.

  9. #9
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    I think politics is filling a couple of voids.

    One is affiliation. The “bowling alone” thesis. As families fracture, traditional forms of civic and social involvement decline and organized religion fades, people turn to politics for an (I think illusory) sense of belonging to a like-minded tribe. Various forms of media make it easy to self-sort in this way.

    Another is meaning. As faith, tradition and other value systems are deconstructed, demeaned and diminished, we are left with the thin gruel of politics as a substitute. We confuse ideology with morality. The self-righteousness of the Moral Majority finds new expression in call out culture.

    In the absence of stronger roots to anchor our sense of self, we can exaggerate politics to the point where we might feel it necessary to terminate relationships. I think that is very sad.
    Gee, LDAHL, I agree with you 100%! Common ground between a Reagan conservative and a Sanders liberal!
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  10. #10
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Personally, I don't buy that theory. 35% of today's mass murderers* are white male disaffected losers who target various minorities--sometimes, like Timothy McVeigh, using religion--specifically Christianity--as their excuse to kill. Religion, with its iron grip on its adherents, has been a force for evil as much as for good, historically, IMO. And tradition? Doesn't each generation form its own traditions? I might agree that some trends, like America's unslakable greed, are troubling, but if you believe that tattoos, cannabis, individuals living (even bowling!) alone, decline in marriage and birthrates, etc. are a harbinger of doom, I would argue they're just minor adjustments. People will always form family and friendship bonds, determine which values are important to them as a society, over-correct, fall back, and move on.

    Guns don't kill people, but people with military-grade weapons can kill a lot of innocent people quickly, and I'd prefer that not be an option, personally.

    *https://newrepublic.com/article/1526...4J0L2utdNx38Bg

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