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Thread: Whose Cat Is It Anyway? A Cat Custody Story...Long

  1. #11
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    SQ, talking to a shelter there is probably a wiser move to get some idea. There is a solution waiting that is right for you and the cat.
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  2. #12
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    I was also wondering how old the cat is and how long she had lived with you, SiouzQ.
    Catherine: Would your take on things be different if this were a dog?

  3. #13
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rosarugosa View Post
    Catherine: Would your take on things be different if this were a dog?
    No, I don't think so. A dog would present the same logistical challenges in terms of transport--plus dogs are more high maintenance, so it may be a bigger problem for people who agreed to keep the dog until arrangements could be made. I think I would feel worse about putting a dog in a shelter--especially an older one--and I would hope that a site like Petfinder would help locate a person looking for a "mature" animal. But that's a purely emotional response. I just love dogs more than cats.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  4. #14
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    I think you have a new life and unless you are emotionally attached to the cat, I would let it go to a new owner. There must be rescue groups in your hometown who find homes for elderly/sick people's pets with which you can communicate long-distance to arrange. There is a reason they say cats have nine lives - they adapt as needed.

  5. #15
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    I just have one thing to add: the chances of this cat finding a new home is very low. This is not intended to make Susie feel guilty, it is just a general fact that, granted, doesn’t address the specifics of this cat or her the locality.

  6. #16
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    I just have one thing to add: the chances of this cat finding a new home is very low. This is not intended to make Susie feel guilty, it is just a general fact that, granted, doesn’t address the specifics of this cat or her locality.
    You will find that the no kill shelters are full because – they are no kill.
    Last edited by iris lilies; 8-15-19 at 10:20am.

  7. #17
    Moderator Float On's Avatar
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    I know there are dog groups and probably cat groups who organize transport across country to reunite pets to owners. Maybe a little research and coordination but that would be doable. If I were driving a stretch of that I'd volunteer to take a cat in carrier part way.
    The other option as stated previously get someone outside the family you still know to go get the cat and take it to a shelter. Offer to pay the drop off fee. I think around here it is $25 to drop off a cat at a no-kill shelter.
    Float On: My "Happy Place" is on my little kayak in the coves of Table Rock Lake.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Simplemind's Avatar
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    When grandma decided that she didn't want the cat taken to the shelter that is when it became HER cat. When grandma is getting a dementia diagnosis is when it became THE FAMILY cat (problem).
    My dad was very attached to his cat and when we had to finally move him to dementia care we had to find a place that would also accept his cat. None of us wanted it. We did find a place and it charged (sit down for this) $500 a month for the cat. We paid it. We knew that ^^%% cat had 9 lives and would outlive my dad. He did.
    We wanted him even less after dad died. My niece decided to take him for which I am eternally grateful.
    It is on them to solve this issue along with all the other issues that will present themselves with her dementia. They need to nut up because in the bigger picture this is one of the easier issues for them to resolve and there will be many. They can cut their caregiving teeth on the cat arrangement. God Bless....

  9. #19
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    When grandma decided that she didn't want the cat taken to the shelter that is when it became HER cat. When grandma is getting a dementia diagnosis is when it became THE FAMILY cat (problem).
    Excellent wisdom shared here. Once the authority for the animal's care changes, whether a dog or a cat, other aspects change as well. When you were in MI for the last visit, you could do something, now you cannot.
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  10. #20
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    Animals are not disposable. It’s not hard to arrange for a cat to be flown in cargo. Make arrangements and family members drive it to the airport in a crate. Just because someone did you a favor doesn’t mean you have no responsibility now. Dog or cat I would do the right thing. We drove across the country to get my son’s dog when he couldn’t keep him and flew to Texas to adopt a deaf puppy mill survivor. These weren’t even our dogs.

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