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Thread: KFC's Beyond Meat chicken nugget things?

  1. #41
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultralight View Post
    Perhaps, or to other meats like birds or wild game?
    I would go more with closed system aquaculture, though our park geese population could use some thinning.

    i think some have made a case for buffalo. They would probably thrive where corn once grew before the corn market collapse, if the soil hasn’t been totally depleted.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    I think the current US herd size is ~95 million animals.
    Whoa!

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    I would go more with closed system aquaculture, though our park geese population could use some thinning.
    Have you ever eaten a Canada goose? I have hunted them. The meat can be very dry, though it tastes good. I made it into a stew once, in a crock pot. You need a 12 or 10 gauge shotgun to hunt them, and usually decoys and a lot of other equipment.

  4. #44
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultralight View Post
    Have you ever eaten a Canada goose?
    I have hunted and eaten them. Not my favorite wild game, but totally edible. I won't hunt them now. They are monogamous and pick a lifetime mate. The resident Canada Geese that are here year round in the parks and golf courses are considered a nuisance by some. Denver has had goose roundups by the city to thin the population. They give the meat to food banks. I guess you could say they are grass fed.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    I have hunted and eaten them. Not my favorite wild game, but totally edible. I won't hunt them now. They are monogamous and pick a lifetime mate.
    With my fishing, there came a point where I just became deeply tired, thoroughly exhausted of killing fish.
    From 2013-2018 I killed countless fish that my friends and family ate. These fish were deep-fried almost exclusively. So unhealthy to the max!

    But again, I just tired of it. It weighed on my conscience. So I stopped.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultralight View Post
    But again, I just tired of it. It weighed on my conscience. So I stopped.
    I have accumulated a lot of fish karma, too. Now it’s catch and release, which probably seems silly to some, but less silly than golf to me.

  7. #47
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    I have accumulated a lot of fish karma, too. Now it’s catch and release, which probably seems silly to some, but less silly than golf to me.
    I mostly fish in the mountains using a small piece of yarn for a lure, no hook, so it's catch-and-auto-release, like playing video games with fish, less stress on the fish I figure, it's just as much fun, and I can play with very very little fish in very small beaver ponds.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultralight View Post
    Oh, I have an interesting question. You might know off-hand. Like you said, one cow feeds beef to 18 households approximately. Suppose no one ate cows but rather just consumed the cow's dairy products. How many cows would it take to provide dairy products for 18 households?
    Well that is an interesting math question. On average a healthy cow can produce 90# of milk per day. 1 gallon of milk is 8.6 #. So that is ~11 gallons. The heavier the cream content, the heavier the gallon approaching as much as 11#.

    Cheese: 10# of milk to make 1# of cheese.

    Butter: It takes 2 pounds of whole milk to make one pound of butter.
    1
    quart of Heavy Cream will yield 1# butter plus about 2 cups buttermilk.

    Yogurt: 2 quarts of milk makes just less than 2 quarts of yogurt.

    From there the math depends on household consumption. We only use about 1/2 gallon milk/month. About 2# of cheese. And a pound of butter can last us 2 months. Yogurt gets the most consumption here at a quart/week.

    So our household uses roughly 24# of milk per month. So that one cow that produces milk all year would support my household consumption rate to 1368 households. Generally a cow is "dry" 2 months per year.

    My brother is about to sell a Dairy operation that milks 1800/day and consistently has 400 in the "dry" or "maternity" phase. This is NOT an organic farm. The entire operation is on about 200 acres.





  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gardnr View Post
    Well that is an interesting math question. On average a healthy cow can produce 90# of milk per day. 1 gallon of milk is 8.6 #. So that is ~11 gallons. The heavier the cream content, the heavier the gallon approaching as much as 11#.

    Cheese: 10# of milk to make 1# of cheese.

    Butter: It takes 2 pounds of whole milk to make one pound of butter.
    1
    quart of Heavy Cream will yield 1# butter plus about 2 cups buttermilk.

    Yogurt: 2 quarts of milk makes just less than 2 quarts of yogurt.

    From there the math depends on household consumption. We only use about 1/2 gallon milk/month. About 2# of cheese. And a pound of butter can last us 2 months. Yogurt gets the most consumption here at a quart/week.

    So our household uses roughly 24# of milk per month. So that one cow that produces milk all year would support my household consumption rate to 1368 households. Generally a cow is "dry" 2 months per year.

    My brother is about to sell a Dairy operation that milks 1800/day and consistently has 400 in the "dry" or "maternity" phase. This is NOT an organic farm. The entire operation is on about 200 acres.




    Very interesting!

    I read that milk production is actually the lowest of the animal products when it comes to emissions. Though maybe I am forgetting eggs, eggs might be lower.

    But it is apparently lower than some plants.

    Cheese is very high in emissions though, very bad for the environment, apparently.

  10. #50
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultralight View Post
    Cheese is very high in emissions though, very bad for the environment, apparently.
    The historical buffalo herd in the USA was 60-100 million animals.

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