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Thread: Suicide Rates Up in Rural America

  1. #71
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    I never though Pollan's recommendations in "food rules" were all that difficult or restrictive but it is sort of like, your money or your life. It sort of starts, eat food, not too much, mostly plants. It's pretty basic after that. Don't eat things your grandmother would not recognize as food, things delivered through the window of your car are probably not real food, etc. It seems awfully simple to me. Other than some nit picking, I really don't get someone getting down on the guy.

    My inspiration for vegan was and is my dental hygienist. She is Seventh Day Adventist and has been a full time hygienist and lifetime vegan. She raised two healthy children as vegan and some of the time has been a single mother. Now, her children are out of the house and she is older, but she still spends day at a time backpacking in the mountains with her family. I know that as a fact being a vegan with good nutritional values is more difficult than observing Pollen's diet recommendations. I figured if she could do it, I could.
    Last edited by Rogar; 9-17-19 at 9:45pm.

  2. #72
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    What soured me on Pollan was a presentation wherein he and some foodie friend of his were making a meal of fresh foods and Pollan pointed out how easy the whole process was. Yes, I suppose it was easy for men with elastic schedules and a long history of food preparation to shop for and prepare food in a leisurely fashion--two of them, keep in mind. Very different from the experience of a person who might have worked all day, on her feet, trying to ride herd on children--while simultaneously cleaning, chopping, and cooking, putting in another half hour minimum on her poor, tired feet. I found it a blatant example of elitist myopia.
    it's hard with kids as they are picky eaters. I think it might lead people in the wrong direction into fancy meal preparation (which is fine sometimes when one has time of course), when boring real food might be more realistic, like put a piece of meat and a potato/sweet potato in the oven for dinner etc... Have yogurt for breakfast, or fruit, or oatmeal etc.. Veggies need some prep, doesn't have to be huge, but yea, although there are shortcuts like packaged lettuce and spinach and arugula etc.. Just make the simplest foods you will eat, if there are a few healthy hacks (like canned beans) they can be used, at least you will be nourished even if you don't crack a single recipe book. But it does get more difficult with kids.

    Food growing up was boring enough afterall and we were ok with it, and I was a skinny kid, so kids might not be overweight if food was as deadly dull as I remember it.

    I still want to read Botany of Desire. I really like him
    yea
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  3. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    I had kids I couldn't afford and raised them on Kraft Mac and cheese and Little Debbie snack cakes and they seem to have done just fine. Being able to feed your family organic, unprocessed food all the time is the Holy Grail, but it is difficult to achieve in this culture, and prioritizing a loving family over a perfect diet is a reasonable choice.
    Absolutely. No way would I trade time with my kid for time curating my vegetable crisper. If that means Pop Tarts for breakfast and Tombstone Pizza for dinner every so often, that is a price I will cheerfully pay.

  4. #74
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    It depends on how often I guess. The logical outcome of it is often: your kid (all grown up) develops type 2 diabetes by their 30s.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  5. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by ApatheticNoMore View Post
    It depends on how often I guess. The logical outcome of it is often: your kid (all grown up) develops type 2 diabetes by their 30s.
    Of all my parental worries, that one ranks pretty low. I think there are many possible outcomes between diabetic and food-obsessed neurotic.

  6. #76
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    It wasn't that Pollan's recommendations were wrong--who can argue with "eat whole foods"?--but that it was delivered with such dismissive smugness in the clip I saw.

  7. #77
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    I've only read Pollan, and found him a fun to read, I've never actually seen any clips of him.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  8. #78
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    Of all my parental worries, that one ranks pretty low. I think there are many possible outcomes between diabetic and food-obsessed neurotic.
    Also, type 2 diabetes is eminently reversible in a 30 year-old, if you seek out the right resources.

  9. #79
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    Also, type 2 diabetes is eminently reversible in a 30 year-old, if you seek out the right resources.
    They have to want to and hard if one isn't willing to largely give up junk food. There isn't many possible outcomes for everyone, it is true there is such a thing as too obsessive, but not everyone's body can take much junk food, they might be susceptible to obesity, diabetes etc.. I got overweight as a teenager on junk food even, so much for youthful metabolism, what a myth that is. Of course it's better to just model healthy eating for children, then first have them get sick and then try to recover etc..
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  10. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yppej View Post
    If people only had kids when they could "afford" them the human species would have gone extinct a long time ago.
    I doubt that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Yppej View Post
    There were times when my brothers and I were little the only thing in the house to eat was a jar of peanut butter.
    Are you bragging?

    I am sure you all had to walk six miles in the snow to school too, and uphill -- bothways! LOL

    Things were differnt back in your day! Differnt!

    Quote Originally Posted by Yppej View Post
    People do all sorts of things they can't afford, such as taking out huge student loans they then shift onto taxpayers.
    False equivalency, and you know it.

    People also say annoying things just to be annoying. Would you know anything about that?

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