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Thread: Would you buy a manufactured home in a mobile home park?

  1. #21
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KayLR View Post
    https://www.columbian.com/news/2019/...lead-for-help/

    This type of greed is what would stop me.
    Likewise. Vultures.

  2. #22
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KayLR View Post
    https://www.columbian.com/news/2019/...lead-for-help/

    This type of greed is what would stop me.
    That situation is exactly the potential problem I would fear. Moving a manufactured home is expensive and a major project. The park owners know this, which presents an easy opportunity for them to exploit the residents.

  3. #23
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    Can you find a co-op park? I know they exist in FLA

  4. #24
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    There's a mobile home park up here where residents own their lots. It has a lovely setting and amenities. I could buy into something like that.

  5. #25
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    Likewise. Vultures.
    Remembering that our friends in Palm Springs experienced a snag in their mortgage closing due to their land lease (for their stick built house in a conventional subdivision) I poked arpund the internet on this topic.

    What would you say if you knew that each lease holder, each landlord, made over $1.5 million annually for their Palm Springs holdings?

    Would it matter if you knew the land holders were Native Americans? I mean, in identity politics I dont know what makes a difference.

    This article from 1981 estimates each member of the tribe’s take to be (adjusted for inflation to 2019 ) $1,670,365.

    That is some powerful victimization taking place there.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/archi...-3bcc1eff7b6b/

  6. #26
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I had a quilting acquaintance who leased land, on which their purchased house sat, from Native Americans. (I believe it was in Stanwood, WA.) I wouldn't have, because of jurisdictional uncertainty.

  7. #27
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    When we were looking at properties on Lake Champlain, many of the properties in one of the surrounding towns were on leased land. At first I thought that was fine--the houses themselves were a little cheaper, but then my very risk-averse son sent me an article about people who were evicted from homes they'd had for years because the lease expired and the landowner either just wanted them off, or the owner didn't fulfill township obligations on the property.

    One house we loved was on leased land, but it was only a 5 year lease on a little island that was basically owned by one family! Talk about a lord of the manor/serf relationship. The "lord of the manor" of this island had been interviewed and when asked about the short-term lease, he admitted he could kick people off, and he said in a very flip way, "They're welcome to take their houses with them."

    We decided that we were not at all interested in investing in a home on property that doesn't belong to us.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  8. #28
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    Remembering that our friends in Palm Springs experienced a snag in their mortgage closing due to their land lease (for their stick built house in a conventional subdivision) I poked arpund the internet on this topic.

    What would you say if you knew that each lease holder, each landlord, made over $1.5 million annually for their Palm Springs holdings?

    Would it matter if you knew the land holders were Native Americans? I mean, in identity politics I dont know what makes a difference.

    This article from 1981 estimates each member of the tribe’s take to be (adjusted for inflation to 2019 ) $1,670,365.

    That is some powerful victimization taking place there.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/archi...-3bcc1eff7b6b/
    That's fascinating! And not something I was at all aware of since our casual look at the homes in this mobile park was our first foray of any sort into the possibility of moving to palm springs. It's kind of crazy to think that literally half of the buildings in palm springs are on land lease land like this. Now I feel compelled to dig through real estate listings to see if there's a premium built into the price for fee simple houses there vs. those that are on land lease land.

    SO is not particularly freaked out by the land lease aspect of this, but he has a different relationship to money than I do. It's a shame we both liked the homes so much. I'm probably going to have to be the bad guy that says no, we're not buying into this.

  9. #29
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    This park in Palm Desert might not be to your taste, but it is a co-op where you co-own the land:

    http://palmspringsmobilehomesforsale.com/mobile-homes-for-sale/desert-hot-springs/dillon-estates/

    We went to a conference once in Palm Desert and I did get sun poisoning and almost died from an asthma attack from the dust. If you have any kind of respiratory problems, be aware that it may be problematic.

  10. #30
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    This park in Palm Desert might not be to your taste, but it is a co-op where you co-own the land:

    http://palmspringsmobilehomesforsale.com/mobile-homes-for-sale/desert-hot-springs/dillon-estates/

    We went to a conference once in Palm Desert and I did get sun poisoning and almost died from an asthma attack from the dust. If you have any kind of respiratory problems, be aware that it may be problematic.
    That’s where one set of our friends live, Palm Desert! And they have a house cleaning business. That dust is good for business.

    yes it is my idea of hell.

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