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Thread: Aren't we sick of homogenized housing yet??

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    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Aren't we sick of homogenized housing yet??

    ]Ugh.. A Better Homes and Gardens article popped up in my inbox and I was intrigued by the title: "You Have to See This Stunning Bungalow Transformation!" Having a little bungalow, I'm always interested in ideas. And this was a 1936 Craftsman house.

    You would never know it!! Wright and Morris are rolling over in their graves.. The "charm" of Craftsman completely whitewashed with shiplap, all the unique built-ins removed to create "open concept" and you would never guess this was ever a "charming Craftsman cottage."

    My 1936 California Craftsman had that charming old-house style—formal rooms with built-ins, a fireplace, and cove molding—but the layout wasn’t working for me. The house is 1,400 square feet, and the little rooms felt extra tight. I knew tearing out walls would give me the indoor-outdoor flow I was going for, but it also meant taking out the fireplace. That’s a solution most people wouldn’t consider, but for me, the open space was totally worth it.

    What design trends are you sick of? How do you feel about destroying the original character of a home? Arggghh..


    Here's the article: https://www.bhg.com/decorating/makeo...ow-renovation/
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    She ruined that house. I love built in cabinets.

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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    UGG, yes! All the flooring is rectangular often gray the walls are gray, the shiplap is all over the place, and oh yes itís ďopen concept. ď
    P

    We just 10 minutes ago met with our architect and Iím proud to say that we are keeping our bungalowís little rooms, aint no ď open conceptĒ Happening here. Although I do have to point out that this house has had a mishmash of renovations and additions already,
    we are just trying to stay true to the look. My idea is the front of the house will look like its little 1940s/50s self and the back of the house will have new modern appendages and thatís OK because itís the back of the house.

    Edited to add:


    I read this article and so many things parallel what Iím doing with my Hermann house. Our house is also 1400 ft.≤. I like U shaped kitchens. I was just talking to our architect about a brick floor and as much as I like that idea, itís non-standard and also it would stain so probably I would regret it, but man do I like the idea.

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    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    UGG, yes! All the flooring is rectangular often gray the walls are gray, the shiplap is all over the place, and oh yes it’s “open concept. “


    We just 10 minutes ago met with our architect and I’m proud to say that we are keeping our bungalow’s little rooms, aint no “ open concept” Happening here. Although I do have to point out that this house has had a mishmash of renovations and auditions already, We are just trying to stay true to the look. My idea is at the front of the house will look like it’s a little 1940s/50s self in the back of the house will have new modern appendages and that’s OK because it’s the back of the house.

    I thought of you when I saw this article, IL. I know you of all people will stay true to the spirit of your home.
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    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    We kept our 1950’s living room. The dining room and master bathroom were added in 1970. We did open most of the wall between the galley kitchen and dining room. We also moved the side wall to make that room smaller so we could add a bathroom attached to the master bedroom. We also took a closet out so we could make the guest bathroom bigger and turned a tiny bedroom attached to the master into a walk in closet. It would also make a good nursery. We left the other original bedrooms as they were. The kitchen already had fairly new cabinets. I might have kept the original cabinets depending on the condition.

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    It is a real shame she destroyed the fireplace and the built-ins that make a bungalow a bungalow. It's sad that she did not keep more of the original house.

    I did like the new exterior paint job and opening up the landscaping to see the house, although not sure I would have taken down a redwood to do it!

    What is a shame is that she didn't just build a new house, which could have had what she wanted.

    I did like the brick herringbone floor and I liked the way the house looked after, for the most part. I liked the kid's desk.

    What I don't understand is why you would put shiplap in that house.

    I didn't see any before pictures and that is probably just as well as I get upset when people destroy bungalows, it's my favorite kind of house. My grandparents had a 20's bungalow in Savannah, and how I loved that house.

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    We finished renovating a 1985 ranch this year, and spent a small fortune on built-ins. The cabinet maker said he hardly ever gets to do that. On the other hand, we saved a lot by not going with granite or quartz countertops. I never understood why people want that.

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    Oh gosh, I think I saw a couple of the before--why on earth get rid of the leaded windows, and what is that giant coffin of a firepit? Ugh.

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    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    We finished renovating a 1985 ranch this year, and spent a small fortune on built-ins. The cabinet maker said he hardly ever gets to do that. On the other hand, we saved a lot by not going with granite or quartz countertops. I never understood why people want that.
    So great you are adding craftsmanship to your home, LDAHL! Yes, and the granite thing is definitely a trend I'm tired of. I must say that I did go to a granite place to try to find a remnant for a 2' x 2' base cabinet we put in our kitchen, but DH is hell-bent on gluing together a couple of layers of plywood and putting some kind of a finish on it. We already have the plywood, so it would save us $300.

    Tybee, I took issue with her statement that she took the character out of the house so she could create character with furniture, but I see a dearth of character in the furniture. It all looks like the first thing that pops up under "most popular" on a Wayfair site. The sofa looks cheap to me. Those old diamond paned windows that she replaced--why?? She tried to "invent" character with the clawfoot tub and the herringbone floor, but everything else looks sterile to me.

    (I do have those exact Pottery Barn filing cabinets, and I did use them as a desk, but they're still in NJ. Not sure if they fit up here.)

    Oh, well. to each their own.
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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    Oh gosh, I think I saw a couple of the before--why on earth get rid of the leaded windows, and what is that giant coffin of a firepit? Ugh.
    I know! I mourned the loss of those windows, what an idiot.

    I think expensive granite is beautiful but I worry about the care of it. Supposedly you’re supposed to seal it every year. We have quartz which I love for looks and practicality but I don’t let myself think about the fact that it is a man-made composite material because that makes it tacky. So I don’t let myself think about it.

    I’m pretty sure I’m gonna use an interior designer for this house in Hermann because once the contractor starts you need to have all the materials lined up in advance, there is no leisurely picking out stuff over 30 years like I did with our city house. Anyway, I say this because our brick fireplace Will. Not. Be. Painted. And those ladies love to paint the fireplaces.

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