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Thread: Silly, but eye-opening info-graphic

  1. #11
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    And coffee. How much does schlepping coffee beans around the world cost the environment?

    Eating local would be horribly boring--no spices, nothing but various meats and fishes, vegetables, grains, dairy, some fruits. But really--no spices? Kill me now.

  2. #12
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    And now he looks like death warmed over. Have a cheeseburger, Bill, please!
    (Doing my part eating one meal a day and locally-sourced meat, but pretty sure my coconut milk habit isn't sustainable...)
    I agree about Bill--when I saw him on TV a few months after his vegan diet, it looked like he aged 15 years. BUT that's an aesthetic opinion--not a health one. I still believe that loading up on "real food" is best, minimizing red, factory-farmed meat--the Mediterranean diet for example.

    As for the sustainability chart, I love all the things on the lower end of the chart, except for peanut butter! I hate peanut butter--lifelong aversion--but lentils and tofu and nuts--all that stuff is part of my normal diet. Haven't had lamb in decades, although I used to really love it.

    As for coffee--you're right, and I try as hard as I can to buy free-trade, shade-grown coffee. Not easy to find. Trader Joe's has a brand.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  3. #13
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    Eating local would be horribly boring--no spices, nothing but various meats and fishes, vegetables, grains, dairy, some fruits. But really--no spices? Kill me now.
    I love herbs and spices.

    Looking at my extensive collection, and looking at the volume, and my reorder times, and my supply line, I think if I compromised and ate locally-sourced food for most of my diet, and allowed the spice to still flow, I'd have solved the bulk of the problem.

    The remaining ecological impact of the small weight/volume of spices I consume would be minor in comparison to other things that would still go on in my life because of the structure of our economy.

  4. #14
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Yes--I suppose my spices could hitch a ride on a freighter without too much impact in our soon-to-be dystopian world. And I could surely grow my own herbs. A coconut palm, not so much (though maybe global warming would allow it).

    Over the years, I've hoarded a lot of supplies that will make not buying new fairly easy for me (even legumes, which are not really a favorite), so I guess I'm ready for anything.

  5. #15
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    Yes--I suppose my spices could hitch a ride on a freighter without too much impact in our soon-to-be dystopian world.
    Windjammers may well come back into style for high-price/low-volume cargo, like spices and iPhones :-)

    I don't quite understand today's economy, where I can Amazon Prime a $.25 electronics component, and have it arrive here on my doorstep on this remote island, drop-shipped directly from China, in a couple of days, with no shipping charge.

  6. #16
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    My happiest moments are running out to the back garden and snipping off fresh parsley, cilantro, mint, basil, dill, oregano, rosemary, and sage.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  7. #17
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    My happiest moments are running out to the back garden and snipping off fresh parsley, cilantro, mint, basil, dill, oregano, rosemary, and sage.
    My list would include holy basil, lemon grass, chives, cilantro, dill, mint, and parsley.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    I agree about Bill--when I saw him on TV a few months after his vegan diet, it looked like he aged 15 years. BUT that's an aesthetic opinion--not a health one. I still believe that loading up on "real food" is best, minimizing red, factory-farmed meat--the Mediterranean diet for example.
    My take is that the Mediterranean diet approaches ideal for most people. Even being vegan, I'm not sure I'd recommend it. It's hard to stick to, has a high recidivism rate, typically more prep time in the kitchen, and takes some study to get the proper nutrients. I don't know that the diet gurus have come up with the perfect fit for health and the environment that works for everyone and is not such a huge shift in eating habits.

    Bill's quadruple by-pass, collapsed lung, then a heart attack and two stints back in his carnivore days and then losing 40 pounds may have taken a toll on his looks. It is interesting that Trump appears more robust at almost the same age.

    My family always had a decent food garden with corn, tomatoes, squash, but no spices that I remember. One of my joys still is walking out the backdoor and cutting fresh spinach or lettuce, picking tomatoes, or what ever is in season during our short growing times. It seems like a very good thing for anyone who has the space and time. I suppose from a purely environmental perspective a small urban apartment might have a smaller carbon footprint, but maybe not as fun.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    And coffee. How much does schlepping coffee beans around the world cost the environment?

    Eating local would be horribly boring--no spices, nothing but various meats and fishes, vegetables, grains, dairy, some fruits. But really--no spices? Kill me now.
    I don't like coffee.

    Eating local could be boring. That is an interesting point. I love Indian food. And having some form of it, even if it is just some chana masala and basmati rice, is key to my happiness.
    But maybe those spices and herbs could be grown in IL. I dunno...

  10. #20
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    My take is that the Mediterranean diet approaches ideal for most people. Even being vegan, I'm not sure I'd recommend it. It's hard to stick to, has a high recidivism rate, typically more prep time in the kitchen, and takes some study to get the proper nutrients. I don't know that the diet gurus have come up with the perfect fit for health and the environment that works for everyone and is not such a huge shift in eating habits.
    The vegan diet is a tough one. I am in the third month of being vegan again. Everyday I yearn for proper Indian food with ghee and a dollop of yogurt in it! haha

    Think about a regular vegetarian diet though -- one that includes dairy or dairy & eggs. That is so easy! 95% of restaurants have some good veggie stuff. But the win is huge for both the planet and the animals.
    Huge win, small effort.

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