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Thread: Silly, but eye-opening info-graphic

  1. #31
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    Haven't humans been described as omnivores by nature since like forever? So no I don't think carnivore was ever a common term for it really. New slang, I bet you can find a 60 old biology textbook saying humans are natural omnivores.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  2. #32
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    I suppose some guy made some money by selling a book and promoting some sort of Med diet by his standards. Here's what the Mayo Clinic has to say, if you trust a degree of medical science and want a broader description.

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-l...t/art-20047801
    Ancel Keys was the guy who started it all--touting low-fat foods and becoming a media darling (while dooming millions to inflammation and obesity). Probably some enterprising doctors glommed onto the idea, refined it, and are selling it now. Nothing wrong with whole foods, however they're presented, I suppose.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    I found a vegan diet disastrous, personally, with its glaring nutritional deficiencies. Luckily, I felt ill effects after only a couple of months, so didn't do much damage. I enjoyed my vegetarian fare, and ate lots of eggs and cheese throughout.

    Recent research in the field shows that individual gut biomes are key to each person's optimal nutritional profile. From what I can tell, omnivory suits me best--no one kind of food is problematic, with the possible exception of bread in large quantities. I plan to give carnivory a run, but I expect it to be rather boring for the long haul. Eventually, we'll have a "gut-check," and receive a personally-tailored eating plan, I predict.
    Watch this:

    I found an omnivorous diet disastrous, personally, with its glaring problems, like inflammation and atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, I thought the ill effects were just a normal part of life. It may have done some damage, even though I did enjoy eating the pigs and lambs throughout.

    Recent research in the field shows that individual gut biomes are key to each person's optimal nutritional profile. From what I can tell, a vegetarian whole foods diet suits me best -- no one kind of food is problematic, with the exception of animals and probably their secretions. I plan to give vegan whole foods a run, but I expect it to be a little boring for the long haul. Eventually, we'll have a "gut-check," and receive a personally-tailored plant-based eating plan, I predict.

  4. #34
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    Ancel Keys was the guy who started it all--touting low-fat foods and becoming a media darling (while dooming millions to inflammation and obesity). Probably some enterprising doctors glommed onto the idea, refined it, and are selling it now. Nothing wrong with whole foods, however they're presented, I suppose.
    So here's the other version by the Mayo:
    Interest in the Mediterranean diet began in the 1960s with the observation that coronary heart disease caused fewer deaths in Mediterranean countries, such as Greece and Italy, than in the U.S. and northern Europe. Subsequent studies found that the Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

    The Mediterranean diet is one of the healthy eating plans recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans to promote health and prevent chronic disease.
    It is also recognized by the World Health Organization as a healthy and sustainable dietary pattern and as an intangible cultural asset by the United National Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

    The foundation of the Mediterranean diet is vegetables, fruits, herbs, nuts, beans and whole grains. Meals are built around these plant-based foods. Moderate amounts of dairy, poultry and eggs are also central to the Mediterranean Diet, as is seafood. In contrast, red meat is eaten only occasionally.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    My happiest moments are running out to the back garden and snipping off fresh parsley, cilantro, mint, basil, dill, oregano, rosemary, and sage.
    I do NOT have a green thumb at all! But I hope to someday reach this point. Kudos to you!
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi

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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    It is interesting that Trump appears more robust at almost the same age.
    Really? Any picture I have ever seen of him is of an un-smile, sad, orange man. Maybe I don't see enough pictures of him?
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi

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  7. #37
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    So here's the other version by the Mayo:
    Interest in the Mediterranean diet began in the 1960s with the observation that coronary heart disease caused fewer deaths in Mediterranean countries, such as Greece and Italy, than in the U.S. and northern Europe. Subsequent studies found that the Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

    The Mediterranean diet is one of the healthy eating plans recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans to promote health and prevent chronic disease.
    It is also recognized by the World Health Organization as a healthy and sustainable dietary pattern and as an intangible cultural asset by the United National Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

    The foundation of the Mediterranean diet is vegetables, fruits, herbs, nuts, beans and whole grains. Meals are built around these plant-based foods. Moderate amounts of dairy, poultry and eggs are also central to the Mediterranean Diet, as is seafood. In contrast, red meat is eaten only occasionally.
    How can I put this tactfully? For a person to change their mind they have to be open to new information and evidence. If they don't think evidence matters or if they think new information is something to pathologically avoid, then no new info or evidence has a chance of changing their mind. Just something to think about, not referring to anyone specific here.

  8. #38
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by happystuff View Post
    Really? Any picture I have ever seen of him is of an un-smile, sad, orange man. Maybe I don't see enough pictures of him?
    I don't know, maybe it's a tie. Bill does look a little rough these days.

  9. #39
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    So here's the other version by the Mayo:
    Interest in the Mediterranean diet began in the 1960s with the observation that coronary heart disease caused fewer deaths in Mediterranean countries, such as Greece and Italy, than in the U.S. and northern Europe. Subsequent studies found that the Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

    The Mediterranean diet is one of the healthy eating plans recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans to promote health and prevent chronic disease.
    It is also recognized by the World Health Organization as a healthy and sustainable dietary pattern and as an intangible cultural asset by the United National Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

    The foundation of the Mediterranean diet is vegetables, fruits, herbs, nuts, beans and whole grains. Meals are built around these plant-based foods. Moderate amounts of dairy, poultry and eggs are also central to the Mediterranean Diet, as is seafood. In contrast, red meat is eaten only occasionally.
    Ancel Keys kicked it off with his Seven Countries "study," where he eliminated the countries that didn't fit his narrative, and we've lived with the result for decades.

  10. #40
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    Ancel Keys bad. Ancel Keys bad. Ancel Keys bad.

    LOL

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