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Thread: What are you reading 2020?

  1. #21
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    I tried to read that one, Rosa, and for some reason it lost me, the tone was a little too Dexterish for my taste, so I tried to skip ahead and figure out who had done it, and I was still confused.
    It started very well, I thought.

  2. #22
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    I tried to read that one, Rosa, and for some reason it lost me, the tone was a little too Dexterish for my taste, so I tried to skip ahead and figure out who had done it, and I was still confused.
    It started very well, I thought.
    That's interesting, Tybee. I've never seen Dexter, so cannot comment on the analogy. I guess our differences in likes and dislikes makes the world a more interesting place.

  3. #23
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    I think it might have been my failing, that it was too complicated a plot for me!

  4. #24
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    I think it might have been my failing, that it was too complicated a plot for me!
    I dont much value plotting, I am far more interested in who it happens to, whatever “it” is. So when a plot is complex sometimes I can’t follow it. Or, I’m not interested enough to follow it. Or, if I pay close attention to follow it, then I feel disappointed when it’s over because I think oh is that all there is just a byzantine series of actions? That vs character development, not my cup of tea.

  5. #25
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    IL, spoken like a true Victorian. I hope you read Trollope-- a notoriously bad plotter.

    Reading Reminisces of a Stock Operator by LeFevre, and Declutter with Feng Sui--rereading that one, as read it years ago and am ready for it again.

  6. #26
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    I didn't find the plot hard to follow, but I agree that character development is the most important element. I need to care about the people, or else how can I care about what happens to them? I really liked the main character, "Hen."

  7. #27
    Senior Member beckyliz's Avatar
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    I picked up Hotel Pastis by Peter Mayle at the library used book store. I remember reading his stuff about 20 years ago and enjoying it. I like his writing for the most part - description of life in Provence, etc.,but it is becoming dated; especially they way he writes about women. I wish he would've developed the story line of one of the main characters more; once she met the main male character, her story just faded away and she just became his girlfriend. None of the women in the story had an important role. I'll donate it back to the library or the thrift store.
    "Do not accumulate for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and thieves break in and steal. But accumulate for yourselves treasure in heaven, where moth and rust do not destroy, and thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, your heart is also." Jesus

  8. #28
    Senior Member Greg44's Avatar
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    Just finished the Wright Brothers - by David McCullough - found it very interesting - fascinating. Look how far we have come in just a bit over 100 years of flight. Now reading Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance, which surprising I have found very a good read.

  9. #29
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    The Hundred-Foot Journey, a culinary novel
    Into the Forest, a post-apocalyptic novel
    We Need To Talk About Kevin, also fiction, an epistolary novel about the mother of a killer

  10. #30
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    I just finished A Rip in Heaven by Jeanine Cummins. It is about the murder of her cousins in St. Louis. I lived through that news reporting and it remains one of the biggest murder stories, if not the biggest murder story in STL because it had all the elements of sensationalism: beautiful sympathetic young white women are raped and murdered by four black men. Oh yeah they were thrown off a bridge as well so that was special.

    She is the author of the controversial new book American Dirt.

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