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Thread: What are you reading 2020?

  1. #281
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    I did not finish Bear Town...had enjoyed both the other I read by him, but this one was just too much about the ugliness of high school sports, dying towns...I'm backing off of Begin Again as I am losing sleep.

  2. #282
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    Just finished another David McCullough - Mornings on Horseback. It’s about about the childhood and early adulthood of Theodore Roosevelt, as well as his large extended family. Fascinating.

  3. #283
    Senior Member Greg44's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nswef View Post
    I did not finish Bear Town...had enjoyed both the other I read by him, but this one was just too much about the ugliness of high school sports, dying towns...I'm backing off of Begin Again as I am losing sleep.
    Yes, I wouldn't describe it as a fun book - IMHO he does paint a very realistic picture of the event and reactions to it. I like writers who write scenes so precisely that the reader is consumed into the moment - if that makes sense. I think Fredrik Backman does that.

  4. #284
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg44 View Post
    Yes, I wouldn't describe it as a fun book - IMHO he does paint a very realistic picture of the event and reactions to it. I like writers who write scenes so precisely that the reader is consumed into the moment - if that makes sense. I think Fredrik Backman does that.
    I thought it was a really good book, but definitely not a feel-good type of book.

  5. #285
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    I am reading (and taking my sweet time with it...) Pico Iyer's Autumn Light: Japan's Season of Fire and Farewells

    My daily bicycle rides into the forest take me to displays of fall foliage. It is just getting started. But the days grow short when you reach September, when the autumn weather turns the leaves to flame. (Anderson/Weill)

  6. #286
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tradd View Post
    Just finished another David McCullough - Mornings on Horseback. It’s about about the childhood and early adulthood of Theodore Roosevelt, as well as his large extended family. Fascinating.
    I read that last year and was pleasantly surprised since I am not a big reader of biographies. It was very interesting. I'm not one to characterize politicians into the coastal elite, but I could be swayed after reading it.

  7. #287
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    I read that last year and was pleasantly surprised since I am not a big reader of biographies. It was very interesting. I'm not one to characterize politicians into the coastal elite, but I could be swayed after reading it.
    Have you read his John Adams biography?

  8. #288
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tradd View Post
    Have you read his John Adams biography?
    And is there one that is better then others (more in depth, etc)?
    Siblings kids are direct descendants, so on my to read list.

  9. #289
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToomuchStuff View Post
    And is there one that is better then others (more in depth, etc)?
    Siblings kids are direct descendants, so on my to read list.
    McCullough’s biography of Adams is very in depth. He won the Pulitzer Prize for it. I can’t say enough good things about it.

  10. #290
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    The New Wilderness, post-apocalyptic fiction
    The American Heiress, light fiction set in the late 1800's
    The Signature of All Things, a novel by Elizabeth Gilbert of Eat, Pray, Love fame
    The Green Boat by Mary Pipher about psychologically surviving the present eco-catastrophe

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