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Thread: 2020 garden plans?

  1. #1
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    2020 garden plans?

    Iíve ordered the first 2 small batches of seed for the year. I have garden space but used only about 1/2 of it last year.

    Also going to cut back on the big csa weíve always used and add anotherís spring share, costs the same (if the big csa doesnít raise their prices.) and I probably wonít toss as much? The big one runs June - November and you can buy a share in December. The little one starts in April or May and ends around July, I think. So we get farm fresh organic veggies for the same $ but for another month or so.

    This will result in less driving, but also less food for the freezer. Iím going to need to be VERY organized to make this work.... last year I made a chart, which helped a lot. Iíll have to do that again!

    Are you planting a veggie garden? Is it different than last year?

    Iím doing my usual dry beans and greens and nonred tomatoes, just more than last year.

  2. #2
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    My gardens need to rest....they will be well fed. I have 1 bed that has been resting for a few years. I will put in 4 tomatoes and I'm not sure what i'll do with the other half of it. Doing so little, I will buy starts at the organic farm plant sale.

    We have a full CSA share every year to get variety in our diets. That was paid for 2 weeks ago!

  3. #3
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    This year I will be installing a wildflower meadow on the periphery of our cleared land, in area that was formerly weeds and bittersweet. The veggie garden stays the same size, but I plan to integrate more flowers- particularly stinky marigolds which seems to deter our pet woodchuck from climbing the knee high fence and helping himself to green beans. Fewer peppers I think, I went overboard last year thinking the peppers I grew would be those small lunchbox size but they were full size. Oops. I grow a little of a lot of things, but not winter squashes as 1) they take up so much room 2) you don't eat these fresh anyways so store bought is fine. On either side of the veggie garden that is fenced, I have additional planting areas. One is primarily herbs and seasonings (like garlic and leeks) the other is flowers. Gotta feed the soul, as well as the body.

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    Next year I plan to put in more phlox and for edibles grow squash, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, basil, parsley and stevia. I need to enrich the soil, most of which was fallow last year.

  5. #5
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by herbgeek View Post
    This year I will be installing a wildflower meadow on the periphery of our cleared land, in area that was formerly weeds and bittersweet.
    Let me know how that goes! I don't really have space for a whole meadow, but in Year 3 of living in Grand Isle, now that our neighbors are our trusted friends, I'm going to toe the waters and see what they'd be willing to do to create beautiful and functional lakeshore vegetation--pollinator plants and grasses. A couple of years ago they were hell-bent on mowing down everything at the lakeshore, including cutting down young trees, but they may be more open to a compromise if I can help them see the benefits.

    As for my garden, we will rotate the crops in our 4 32-sqare foot plots and our larger 100-sq.ft. plot, but we'll do the traditional--tomatoes, lettuces, herbs and some wild-card things we haven't decided on yet. We don't have CSAs, but we have twice weekly farmer's markets up here, and we'll buy the things that we don't want to grow.

    We'll probably do some starts inside or outside in a portable greenhouse/cold frame in late March/early April, but our growing season starts kind of late, so we won't put anything in the ground until May.

    Also, I'm going to expand on shrubs and plantings along a pathway--I'm considering rhododendrum and/or berry bushes. I also miss my hydrangea and peonies from NJ, so I may get a couple for up here.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  6. #6
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Herbgeek and Catherine,

    i am curious about your methodology of creating wildflower plantings. comment if you wish.

    The ones I have seen planted by, shall we say amateurs, turn into a big weedy mess. Even those wild plant areas planned and maintained by knowledgeable horticulturalists are are scrubby looking. Just be prepared for that. But
    I also think it is great to jump in with both feet and try something.

    Last year we kicked out of our community garden a person who thought she could sow wildflower seeds and have a perfect garden. Thing is, she didn’t bother to weed it so not surprisingly the weeds took over. But she didn’t put any effort into it so that is a large part of the problem. It was her fifth year of low-to-no effort so she got the boot.

  7. #7
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    Herbgeek and Catherine,

    i am curious about your methodology of creating wildflower plantings. comment if you wish.

    The ones I have seen planted by, shall we say amateurs, turn into a big weedy mess. Even those wild plant areas planned and maintained by knowledgeable horticulturalists are are scrubby looking. Just be prepared for that. But
    I also think it is great to jump in with both feet and try something.

    Last year we kicked out of our community garden a person who thought she could sow wildflower seeds and have a perfect garden. Thing is, she didn’t bother to weed it so not surprisingly the weeds took over. But she didn’t put any effort into it so that is a large part of the problem. It was her fifth year of low-to-no effort so she got the boot.
    My approach/methodology would be this:

    Go slow... we already have vegetation but it's just random grassy stuff and weeds. One of my neighbors has enlisted me and others to rid the that area of the cockleburs which are all over the place. We removed about 15 contractor bags full last year. But I know my limitations, and so I would ONLY tackle what I KNOW I could follow through on. The worst thing I could do here is try and fail.

    I would probably focus on just one or two things that would add color and some consistency--like milkweed, bergamot, or rudbeckia, along with some native grasses, and again start very small and slow.

    My main sales pitch would be discouraging geese. We do have a geese problem, which my neighbors HATE (so do I)--they drive wooden stakes with string into the ground.

    It would definitely be a trial and error effort, so I'm open for suggestions. In my dreams, our shoreline would eventually look like one of these:

    https://regenlanddesign.wordpress.co...e-waters-edge/
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  8. #8
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Our local park has a huge problem with geese and vegetation does help a lot to discourage them. Milkweed may not thrive in wet areas but I am sure that you could find the native species that would do well. Some shrubs help to stabilize the wet areas and encourage both native fauna as well as protect the native flora. Sounds like a fun project!
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  9. #9
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    My approach/methodology would be this:

    Go slow... we already have vegetation but it's just random grassy stuff and weeds. One of my neighbors has enlisted me and others to rid the that area of the cockleburs which are all over the place. We removed about 15 contractor bags full last year. But I know my limitations, and so I would ONLY tackle what I KNOW I could follow through on. The worst thing I could do here is try and fail.

    I would probably focus on just one or two things that would add color and some consistency--like milkweed, bergamot, or rudbeckia, along with some native grasses, and again start very small and slow.

    My main sales pitch would be discouraging geese. We do have a geese problem, which my neighbors HATE (so do I)--they drive wooden stakes with string into the ground.

    It would definitely be a trial and error effort, so I'm open for suggestions. In my dreams, our shoreline would eventually look like one of these:

    https://regenlanddesign.wordpress.co...e-waters-edge/
    Thats a good article.it is realistic in talking about the aesthetics of a native shoreline garden. The Enhanced native approach sounds next to me.

    Wewere at the Chicago Botanic garden shown in the article a few years ago for the North American Lily Society conference. I do not remember the shoreline plantings, though.

  10. #10
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    Thats a good article.it is realistic in talking about the aesthetics of a native shoreline garden. The Enhanced native approach sounds next to me.

    Wewere at the Chicago Botanic garden shown in the article a few years ago for the North American Lily Society conference. I do not remember the shoreline plantings, though.
    Yes, that approach (the Enhanced Native from Chicago) would really be ideal. Here's a picture of part of our shoreline--you can see the challenges.

    IMG_0653.jpg
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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