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Thread: Quorn Mycoprotein "Meatless Fillets"

  1. #1
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    Quorn Mycoprotein "Meatless Fillets"

    At my market in the frozen foods I found 9.7oz boxes marked down to $1.99. So I bought a couple boxes.

    Do any of you good people cook with Quorn Meatless Fillets? If so, how do you like to prepare it?

    I was thinking I might add the Quorn "fillets" to a liquid stew (already a frozen leftover) containing red kidney beans, tomato puree, onions, garlic, and salsa. Since I will be home alone for a few days, this will be an opportune time to experiment in the kitchen. I might add in some leftover wild rice.

    I eat commercial and wild mushrooms quite often, with no ill effects, so I assume that I will not have an allergic reaction to Mycoprotein, which I understand is Fusarium venenatum fungus, fed and fermented on an industrial scale.

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    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Never having seen these as yet, I await your evaluation of the product. I haven't tried any of the drive-thru outlets versions either.
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    I've seen them in the store but never purchased them. Aren't they corn based? Look forward to reading your evaluation.
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    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    I've tried them in the past. They were decent, though they didn't cost anywhere near as little as $1.99. My main issue with them is that, though they may be "all-natural" products, they're still very heavily processed. As I don't have an objection to eating meat, at their regular price I think I'm better served by buying responsibly-produced real muscle cuts of meat rather than Quorn. Just my thinking, though....
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    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveinMN View Post
    I've tried them in the past. They were decent, though they didn't cost anywhere near as little as $1.99. My main issue with them is that, though they may be "all-natural" products, they're still very heavily processed. As I don't have an objection to eating meat, at their regular price I think I'm better served by buying responsibly-produced real muscle cuts of meat rather than Quorn. Just my thinking, though....
    I haven't tried quorn--I think it's fungus-based--and I'm with you. Someone pointed out the ingredient list for the "Impossible Burger" is indistinguishable from dog food. Dogs and people do best on their natural diets, even as we fall short, I think.

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    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    My sister is an on-again, off-again vegetarian, and I know she likes Quorn, but I'm not sure how she prepares it. I'm an omnivore, so if I want meat, I will eat meat. I don't tend to eat lots of red meat, but I've read that grass-fed beef is healthier than these heavily processed meat substitutes.

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    I don't eat much red meat, but mushrooms make me sick in their original form. Bah, mushrooms.
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    According to Wikipedia, it is grown from a fungus:

    Quorn is made from the soil mould Fusarium venenatum strain PTA-2684 (previously misidentified as the parasitic mould Fusarium graminearum). The fungus is grown in continually oxygenated water in large, otherwise sterile fermentation tanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    According to Wikipedia, it is grown from a fungus:

    Quorn is made from the soil mould Fusarium venenatum strain PTA-2684 (previously misidentified as the parasitic mould Fusarium graminearum). The fungus is grown in continually oxygenated water in large, otherwise sterile fermentation tanks.
    Oh, Yum!
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  10. #10
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I could happily eat red meat every day, but there are only so many meals, and I like many other foods as well.

    Bucking current food fads, I'm convinced it's one of the most nutritious and environmentally sound foods you can eat (at least local, pastured beef).

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