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Thread: Tightrope - a book review of family, community and government

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    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Tightrope - a book review of family, community and government

    I had read this book review and just listened to the interview. It covers so many points that have been discussed here and offers hope and possible solutions. I don't think that it is unique to the US but some other countries have handled some of the situations differently, the opioid crisis is one example which has harmed so many families.

    https://www.csmonitor.com/Books/2020...ericans.-audio

    Has anyone read this book?
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by razz View Post
    I had read this book review and just listened to the interview. It covers so many points that have been discussed here and offers hope and possible solutions. I don't think that it is unique to the US but some other countries have handled some of the situations differently, the opioid crisis is one example which has harmed so many families.

    https://www.csmonitor.com/Books/2020...ericans.-audio

    Has anyone read this book?
    Here is what the author says straight out in this interview: “ ...there is no safety net” speaking of social services.*

    I guess Washington D.C. hasnt been getting my tax check.

    What an absolutely ridiculous and insulting statement about those of us tax paying citizens who provide social services delivered through our government. Thanks for nothing? Gee, I guess.

    I won’t be reading this book.

    here is entire quote: The reason we chose the title “Tightrope,” it goes to your issue that there are absolutely people who managed to cross the tightrope, and bravo to them. But if you’re on the tightrope, then maybe you’ll make it across, but one stumble and that’s it. There’s no safety net.

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    There is some safety net, but the problem is the people who often need it most, aren't the type of people who are necessarily super skilled at navigating it. For instance a lot of the homeless might be able to qualify for disability it seems to me, but to expect them to navigate a super complex system, it's just a pretty radical mismatch between the people being served and the type of system they are being asked to navigate, some of them have mental disabilities, mental illness etc.. Ha and people wonder why $1000 checks with no strings attached have their constituencies, although even then there would probably be those who prey on the vulnerable and their checks.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

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    I have that book on my hold list at the library but will reserve judgement until I have read it. I only skimmed through the interview but noted that authors were worried that readers would judge that the folks who were featured had created their own misery by making bad choices. I am concerned about how so many have fallen through the cracks even with some "safety nets." There seem to be way too many people (especially young) where I live now making really sad/bad choices that lead to drug abuse, homelessness, suicide, theft and on and on. I keep wondering...is it parenting, social media, the way we educate, lack of positive role models? Here in Colorado, mental health services are apparently almost non-existent.

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    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Poor people's bad choices may set them up for a lifetime of poverty and loss, while rich people's bad choices often lead to a paid-off mistress, a golden parachute, or a succession of bankruptcies--after which they can go on their merry way.

    I'll probably read this.

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    I'm on the wait list at the library. Saw an interview with the authors, thought it seems interesting.

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    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ApatheticNoMore View Post
    There is some safety net, but the problem is the people who often need it most, aren't the type of people who are necessarily super skilled at navigating it.
    My Mom works every week at our local Family Resource Center, helping folks deal with this issue.

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    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    Some states are better than others for social services. Here is the worst I have seen after living in 5 different states. Kansas had fairly decent services. They especially had services to help kids age out of foster homes and into housing, jobs, etc instead of saying tough luck like Nevada does. You can’t apply for disability without being able to get mail and either to respond to correspondence or have someone to do it for you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    Here is what the author says straight out in this interview: “ ...there is no safety net” speaking of social services.*

    I guess Washington D.C. hasnt been getting my tax check.

    What an absolutely ridiculous and insulting statement about those of us tax paying citizens who provide social services delivered through our government. Thanks for nothing? Gee, I guess.

    I won’t be reading this book.

    here is entire quote: The reason we chose the title “Tightrope,” it goes to your issue that there are absolutely people who managed to cross the tightrope, and bravo to them. But if you’re on the tightrope, then maybe you’ll make it across, but one stumble and that’s it. There’s no safety net.
    Unfortunately, it's not enough that we pay our taxes. We also have to vote for leaders who are going to make a strong safety net in every state a priority. My state, California, has a huge, urgent problem with lack of affordable housing, so it's not perfect in any way, but I don't have to look far to see my tax dollars at work in ways I care about. We have great public libraries, great, cheap community colleges (I teach at one), great parks, and increasing investment in better early childhood education. And I vote for those priorities every time I enter a voting booth.

    It sounds to me like the point of the book is to wake ourselves up about our fellow Americans who are in need so that we can demand that our government implement policies that will effectively help them. I'm putting it on my reading list!

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