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Thread: I don't understand how to pick a career on my own?

  1. #1
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    I don't understand how to pick a career on my own?

    Isn't the idea job-stability should come
    first, then salary, then job-satisfaction?

    Most of the jobs I'm interested in or
    capable of are low-income; and it stinks!
    ______

    Please rank these jobs in
    order from most to least stable:

    - Barista at Coffee-Bean
    - Adult ESL-Teacher
    - Math-Tutoring
    - Medical-Billing and Coding
    - Computer Support Technician

    Thank You

  2. #2
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    Rainbow, you've asked all this before. You've been given lots of good information and suggestions.

    Go get professional help if you can't decide by yourself how to run your life.

  3. #3
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gardnr View Post
    Rainbow, you've asked all this before. You've been given lots of good information and suggestions.

    Go get professional help if you can't decide by yourself how to run your life.
    yes, please.

    and here “go get professional help” is not meant as a put down. Truly, you sound lost, and you sound as though you dont have, or do not trust, the guidance of others in your life.

    If your family is telling you that you must find a career that involves “stability” and “middle-class” income, they are not necessarily right for you. But you DO have to, as a man of the age of 30+, figure out your life path.

    What are your responsibilities while living under your parents’s roof? I ask because you may be doing much more as a family member than your posts indicate.

    But frankly, to me, you sound depressed. Visiting a good therapist who gets you might be life changing.

  4. #4
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rainbow-Flame Mystic View Post
    Isn't the idea job-stability should come
    first, then salary, then job-satisfaction?
    That's the way some people look at it. But many of us can tell you that particular stable jobs can be a soul-killers, so maybe that shouldn't be #1 on the list.

    I read a book many years ago which discussed what work would look like in the future. The days of getting a job fresh out of school; going to work for "the man" five days a week in the same building, for decades on end; and sticking around by doing little more than keeping your nose clean are gone forever. It's just not the way the world works, anywhere.

    The book made a point about job security by mentioning a guy who decided to do what he liked to do and became a professional house painter. It's a job that requires some skill and a few reasonably-priced tools to do properly. And it always will be in demand. This guy may not be able to tell you exactly at which address he'll be working in two years, but the odds are pretty good that, if he's skilled at his work and not a sociopath, he'll be working somewhere, enjoying his job even if every aspect of his work is not nailed down tight.

    Rainbow-Flame, you're young. You are likely to have a few different careers before you get to be the age most of us are. Many of us have had a few different careers by now, too. You need to figure out what it is you like to do and what takes advantage of your skills and interests because you're going to be using those skills and interests to make a living for the next 50 years.

    As the others have mentioned, professional help is your best move right now. Go to wherever you last went to school -- high school, community college, four-year school, wherever, and ask about "vocational guidance". There are quizzes you can take to help you identify the best jobs for you and people who can help you identify what you could do after you start in whatever field interests you. There are journals and Web sites that predict job demand for different lines of work.

    And if it turns out that the work that really does it for you doesn't pay enough to make your expenses, then re-think your expenses. Or suck it up for a little while in a job you're not crazy about but pays the bills and then some -- until you can go where you want and do what you want to do. Seriously, we've given you about as much help here as we can given the information we have, and you sound like you're stuck. You need a plan. Others can help you define the plan, but you have to work it. We can't make those decisions for you.
    Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome. - Booker T. Washington

  5. #5
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gardnr View Post
    Rainbow, you've asked all this before. You've been given lots of good information and suggestions.

    Go get professional help if you can't decide by yourself how to run your life.
    Best advice possible.
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

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    Staying at the same job for 40 years was maybe WWII Gen or Boomer mythology. The never mind any particular employer, just work on your skillsets and job hop at will because they aren't loyal to you, don't be loyal to them, was definitely Gen X mythology, a gospel preached constantly all day long. The thing is I doubt either has worked since the great recession. The former is an unrealistic expectation aside from a few government workers, and the later radically devalues stable employment. The stats are most jobs created since the great recession are contract and temp jobs, those non-temp jobs to hop between aren't so easily had. It seems to me people job hop somewhat less than they used to.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ApatheticNoMore View Post
    It seems to me people job hop somewhat less than they used to.
    Not around here. Young college grads are having 2-4 on their resumes by the time they are 2y out of college. Hiring agencies don't seem to mind.

    I had 3 employers in 39y. (the 2nd was sold to the 3rd). I am 58.

    There is a lot of competition for healthcare workers so people are moving around right here for 1.50-$5/hr.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Those are all basically entry level jobs and any of them could be a secure opportunity by getting some experience, more responsibility and looking for advancement. Otherwise, as they sit, least secure to most from top to bottom of your list.

  9. #9
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    OP, I don't understand why you post questions here but then do not respond to the answers you get?
    If you need help, please reach out in real life, the career counseling office at the community college near you would be happy to help you.

  10. #10
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    There are probably lots of us who never quite figure out what we want to be when we grow up. Looking back, I think family turmoil while I was still at home derailed any solid plans. At some point though, you have to be responsible for your own life and try different things. After lots of jobs, mostly retail and entrepreneurial efforts, I took a temp office job with the state university where I lived. That led to different posts (several every boring and many very interesting) within that system as I worked my way up. I think there were quite a few "formerly lost" employees like you, Flame, who finally found a stable path within that system. As a retiree now, I feel very fortunate to have solid health care coverage and a pension so it all worked out.

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