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Thread: Adventures in grocery shopping

  1. #221
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    DGS and I u-picked a bushel of Roma tomatoes and 1/2 bu of bell peppers for $24 so I am canning for the next few days making salsa and stewed tomatoes. He had never picked veggies in a field so enjoyed the experience. Fresh whole garlic is $7/lb or $10 for 2 lb. I had a really hard time finding any cider vinegar which even the large groceries were missing but, needing it for the salsa recipe, I found it at the drug store and got it 20% off for senior day so got enough priced normally.
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  2. #222
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    I knew it was coming but still was shocked to get an email from a local grocer with this:

    WEATHER IMPACT ON FRESH PRODUCE - We have been advised by our suppliers that fires and hurricanes have the potential for a negative impact on the quality of our fresh produce in the coming weeks.
    California leafy vegetables, lettuce, broccoli and cauliflower- these items are showing stress due to high temperatures. This includes irregular sizing, shapes, tip burn and possible discoloration. In addition leafy items could also show signs of ash from the River wild fire near Salina’s CA. The industry is adding extra steps to the cleaning of product for value added items, but field packed whole leaf items could be impacted by signs of ash.
    Hurricanes /tropical storms could cause damage or disruptions ports, which could delay banana in bound shipments. The storms also have the potential to damage southern grown crops such as peppers, cucumbers, squash, cabbage and cooking greens.
    Excessive heat in Canada is negatively impacting Ontario green-house operation, severally limiting supply and reducing quality.
    The California heat wave is also taking a toll on several fruits. Strawberry quality is lower than normal with heavy bruising. Blackberries will likely be unavailable due to the heat and low production.
    Extreme temperatures are causing issues for our peach and nectarine growers, which will likely impact supply.
    We continue to do our best to source the best produce possible, but these are conditions out of anyone's control. We appreciate your understanding and patience as we work through this time together.

  3. #223
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Usually we have 1/2 bushels of tomatoes, peppers etc and 10lb bags of onions, beets and carrots in every grocery at this time of year but no 10lb of this season's produce as yet and only limited peppers and eggplants in 1/2 bushels. I am tempted to go to the farm and get enough cabbage to make sauerkraut this year.
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  4. #224
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    Quote Originally Posted by frugal-one View Post
    I knew it was coming but still was shocked to get an email from a local grocer with this:

    WEATHER IMPACT ON FRESH PRODUCE - We have been advised by our suppliers that fires and hurricanes have the potential for a negative impact on the quality of our fresh produce in the coming weeks.
    California leafy vegetables, lettuce, broccoli and cauliflower- these items are showing stress due to high temperatures. This includes irregular sizing, shapes, tip burn and possible discoloration. In addition leafy items could also show signs of ash from the River wild fire near Salina’s CA. The industry is adding extra steps to the cleaning of product for value added items, but field packed whole leaf items could be impacted by signs of ash.
    Hurricanes /tropical storms could cause damage or disruptions ports, which could delay banana in bound shipments. The storms also have the potential to damage southern grown crops such as peppers, cucumbers, squash, cabbage and cooking greens.
    Excessive heat in Canada is negatively impacting Ontario green-house operation, severally limiting supply and reducing quality.
    The California heat wave is also taking a toll on several fruits. Strawberry quality is lower than normal with heavy bruising. Blackberries will likely be unavailable due to the heat and low production.
    Extreme temperatures are causing issues for our peach and nectarine growers, which will likely impact supply.
    We continue to do our best to source the best produce possible, but these are conditions out of anyone's control. We appreciate your understanding and patience as we work through this time together.
    I'm thinking maybe I should stock up a little more on sprouting seeds. At least that will provide some fresh greens should things get tight.
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi

    Be nice whenever possible. It's always possible. - Dalai Lama

  5. #225
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    I think we have become very accustomed to finding whatever we want whenever we want at the grocery. Climate disruptions will definitely have an impact as we move forward. Here, the weather is going from 90s to high 20s over night. All our still ripening produce is toast.

  6. #226
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    Quote Originally Posted by happystuff View Post
    I'm thinking maybe I should stock up a little more on sprouting seeds. At least that will provide some fresh greens should things get tight.
    Where do you buy them ... locally or online?

  7. #227
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    I usually buy them online... got good recommendations from folks on the forums. I also just found a Asian grocery store close to me that carries mung beans and such. I'm going to give them a try and see how they sprout. It would be nice to have something local and less expensive.
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi

    Be nice whenever possible. It's always possible. - Dalai Lama

  8. #228
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    I’ve been buying what I run out of from an organic farm stand. Previously, I got what I needed from our CSA, but I cut it in 1/2 this year to save money. I have 3 more CSA visits left, thru mid Nov. So I’m hoarding them... I’ll go again in a couple of weeks, then mid October and the beginning of November.

    Cutting the CSA in half works, for fresh eating just fine, in fact it can easily still be too much. But it’s not enough food to put anything aside for winter, even the tiny amount I do... so I’ve been filling in the blanks.

    I think that my experiment is a qualified success. I signed up with another farm for their early spring CSA, which started a month before our regular one. And I cut our regular CSA in half to pay for it. But I’m buying produce, so... not quite what I was hoping for.

  9. #229
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Finding a system that works does require ongoing research such as what you are doing. Well done!
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  10. #230
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    Where do you buy them ... locally or online?
    I've been buying mine at True Leaf Market for a few years. When I first got into salad gardening*, I found they were one of the least expensive sources (it was Handy Pantry then, now acquired by True Leaf Market). Germination has been reliable.

    * salad gardening: https://www.amazon.com/Year-Round-In...9913604&sr=8-5

    Salad gardening is sprouts grown in soil, versus sprouts grown just in a jar. The book I linked outlines the method and gives lots of tips. This will be the 5th winter for me in growing soil sprouts. I don't tend to use these as a salad on their own(although you can, and I have) but as an addition to purchased lettuce or for sandwiches.

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