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Thread: Economic outlook

  1. #11
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    As a wise movie character once said ‘stupid is as stupid does’.
    masks are for when you can't avoid people, obviously avoiding people is preferable. But I suspect for every one idiot infected because they are partying, there is at least one infected because they live in crowded conditions, and at least one infected because of their work.

    Yes of course the economy is going to be bad, already this neighborhood is getting more shady, more and more people living in cars (with tinted windows and stuff even, 100% illegal to have tinted windows at all, I know I've fell afoul of that law just trying to keep the car cool with less A/C in summer before, but hey). It's not by and large a dangerous neighborhood but I really suspect more and more parked cars with people living in them from what I've seen, and other crazy behavior as well.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tradd View Post
    I see man restaurants around me with areas blocked off in parking lots for outdoor dining. Here in northern IL, we've got maybe another 2-2.5 months before the weather starts going downhill.
    If they included women as well they might do better.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yppej View Post
    If they included women as well they might do better.
    Hah! Meant MANY

  4. #14
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    Nevada’s economy is heavily tourist dependent. The north did diverse some after the last recession. The casinos are planning on laying off half their employees.

  5. #15
    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
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    I agree with everyone and what they are seeing. When the small businesses fail, who will fill the storefronts? The building owners are in for a world of hurt as well.
    i was thinking of churches too. Congregations have not been gathering and dropping money into baskets. Surely many of the faithful continue to make contributions though. Our gym is urging us to come, yet they have lost many members. I just see it across so many segments of society. And each person struggling will spend less, possibly lose home, or put their educational pursuits on the back burner.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    Flowers, my church had been maintaining a level of contributions equal to budget most months. Churches unfortunately lost the contributions at Easter when a lot is put in the collection plate from non regular members.

  7. #17
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    My temple is financial established such that they do not need to depend on contributions.
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi

    Be nice whenever possible. It's always possible. - Dalai Lama

  8. #18
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    IMHO
    Fundamental services like grocery, hospital, transit will continue with modifications as necessary.

    Re churches - more have proven that online services do attract members. Periodic visiting in small groups to maintain fellowship will be necessary.

    Small stores - the personal touch will be more appreciated as human beings are very social. While striving for the best price, people do value good service whether a garage, a hair stylist or clothing store. It is all about building community support.

    Restaurants have a long history of coming and going. It is the spacing that is the challenge. Who would have imagined so many donut shops or a McDonalds in each community? Or so many variety stores, etc? What changed to make this expansion evolve so extensively? Looking back at the roots of change will show a pathway ahead for the next generation of stores and services.

    I am concerned about the audience-based businesses and all the dependents on their operations though. Tourism, theatres, convention centres, hotels will need to rebuild once confidence is restored.

    The human being is resilient. If society can obtain shelter, food and an opportunity, it will overcome the challenges. Many have coasted along for about two generations taking life and opportunities and services for granted. A sense of entitlement has grown that was not earned. Look at the challenges around the world and see how blessed NA has been. It was not infinitely sustainable.
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  9. #19
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    I think the pandemic has accelerated some pre-existing trends.

    Governments were already fairly highly leveraged through pushing rates down, expanding their balance sheets and diluting the value of their currencies. All the new pandemic spending will serve to inflate the bubbles further. Canadaís recent credit downgrade may just be an early indication of more to come.

    Higher educationís business model was probably unsustainable before the current recession. They may find themselves in an adapt or die situation in coming years.

    We are overproducing aspirants to various elites by creating far more PhDs, lawyers and other specialties of questionable economic value than there are positions available, often debt-financed. The current situation only highlights the increase in educated, resentful members of the population.

    Automation and expert systems may be seen as safer as well as more cost-effective than troublesome staff.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    A third of lawyers never practice and there are definitely not enough jobs for professors.

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