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Thread: Is where you live gaining stature?

  1. #21
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    Northern Wisconsin is beautiful but winter is brutal. I lived in a small town once and there’s nothing to do and everyone knows your business. Even Kenosha with a 100k people lacks things to do.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
    Northern Wisconsin is beautiful but winter is brutal. I lived in a small town once and there’s nothing to do and everyone knows your business. Even Kenosha with a 100k people lacks things to do.
    I'm actually considering a move to Madison in the next year or two. That's where my diving instructor is and there's lots to do, with it being a university town. All the local lakes to dive.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    Madison is a very nice town. With the big university there’s probably a lot to do. Also it’s not up north so winters aren’t as bad.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
    Madison is a very nice town. With the big university there’s probably a lot to do. Also it’s not up north so winters aren’t as bad.
    Remember, I like cold, so that's not an issue. Plus, I have a work from home job, so wouldn't have to worry much about commuting in the snow. A lot will depend on cost of living up there.

  5. #25
    Senior Member SiouzQ.'s Avatar
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    Rumor has it from my real estate agent neighbor that her big, expensive properties around the Madrid, NM area are garnering a lot of interest from people wanting to escape California. They are going have to have a strong sense of adventure before going into buying anything here in poor, rural New Mexico. Locally, we have spotty internet, no local police, a rather large drug problem, plenty of burglaries, and packs of roaming dogs. I love it but hate it when people move here and haven't done all the proper research, then have this expectation that they can transfer the cushy lives from wherever they are coming from and set it up here in the "outback". I live in a throw back era where word-of-mouth gets you the right trades person and car repair person. You have to develop relationships out here, be flexible, very patient and be able to give-and-take as situations arise. I learned that almost instinctively within the first few weeks after moving here; it was a very abrupt change that I had not considered when I moved from urban Michigan.

  6. #26
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SiouzQ. View Post
    I love it but hate it when people move here and haven't done all the proper research, then have this expectation that they can transfer the cushy lives from wherever they are coming from and set it up here in the "outback".
    I have been having an on-going discussion with an on-line friend of mine who lives near (but is unaffected by) the Ozarks. He envisions a great exodus from cities in the wake of the pandemic since "now you can work from anywhere, so why would you want to live in a city"? Never mind that if you don't have that kind of job (which most people do not), your options in his little town (or near it) are quite limited. Never mind that his wife has an hour-long commute to her corporate job. Or even that picking up something you forgot at the supermarket requires a couple of gallons of gas for the round-trip to Walmart. That life works for him and that’s fine; no need to change what's working, eh? But I don't let him complain about crappy Internet access or how long it takes to drive to stores other than Walmart.

    Every place has choices and consequences. But as city folk move out beyond the suburbs, they will not be able to reasonably expect "city" levels of services (plowing, hospitals, etc.). I hope they do their research or they may make an unhappy mistake. And then find out they won't be paid big city (HCOL) wages for living in LCOL areas. HR departments caught up to that some time ago for on-site workers; I suspect they'll figure it out for remote workers as well.
    Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome. - Booker T. Washington

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
    Madison is a very nice town. With the big university there’s probably a lot to do. Also it’s not up north so winters aren’t as bad.
    It will be interesting to see what happens to these university towns/cities with more classes being virtual and a reduced number of students no longer needing to be on a physical campus.
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi

    Be nice whenever possible. It's always possible. - Dalai Lama

  8. #28
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    Attending college in person is so much better and remember I teach a online college class. You have great spontaneous discussions. Online you have a discussion board and you have time to craft your response. Especially at the bachelor level it’s important.

  9. #29
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I edited on-line college coursework in my last job--probably the only one I ever had I could do from home.

    Exurbs don't appeal to me, in the same way that country living holds no appeal. Not much to do, but lots of space to do it in.

  10. #30
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    I agree completely, Terry. I know my alma mater in Massachusetts is going with full undergraduate in person classes, although they are making a lot of changes in the physical environment and housing, and they are cutting classes by 1 per semester, so that 3 classes is a full load.

    My brother's alma mater, Harvard, is only taking the freshman back and the seniors, but he said the freshman are going the first half of the year and the seniors the second. So that is in effect 25% occupancy.

    My son's alma mater, Emerson, also in Boston, is doing a big modification thing, but still holding in-person classes.

    It's so interesting to see all the different approaches.

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