Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Thread: Harvesting seeds

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    4,165
    It is extremely dry here so I store in paper envelopes inside sleeved photo albums. I found it helpful to check out some seed saving books from the library.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    2,269
    Thanks!
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi

    Be nice whenever possible. It's always possible. - Dalai Lama

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Price County, WI
    Posts
    1,321
    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post

    I have had the best luck with these retaining original parent characteristics:

    French marigolds, Cleome, alyssum, four oclocks
    I have had good luck with nasturtiums and lupines.

  4. #14
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    16,945
    Quote Originally Posted by dado potato View Post
    I have had good luck with nasturtiums and lupines.
    I didn’t know there was an annual variety of lupine, or maybe you’re talking about perennials? Anyway, we can’t grow lupines here it’s too hot and humid they just crump. But nasturtiums are probably a good bet. I see them in several beds at our community garden

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    4,165
    Coming from Texas, I was not familiar with nasturtiums. Decided to plant some seeds from a local seed company, Botanical Interests (they have beautiful illustrations), around my tomatoes here in Colorado and they are now flowering. Something I read in an old gardening book, Noah's Garden, said that we need to be reminded that seeds figure out themselves when the best time to germinate is. The author got the best results from gathering, storing in a cool, dry place through winter and then sowing directly when the soil warms up. Some will take more than a year to be ready - just depends on the type of plant. I have seed packets that are five years old or more and they all came up this spring.

  6. #16
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    12,288
    The extent of my horticultural adventures: I used to eat nasturtiums as a child; I've always loved spicy food.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Price County, WI
    Posts
    1,321
    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    I didn’t know there was an annual variety of lupine, or maybe you’re talking about perennials? Anyway, we can’t grow lupines here it’s too hot and humid they just crump. But nasturtiums are probably a good bet. I see them in several beds at our community garden
    Lupine is perennial, but the plant makes pods of seeds each year.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •