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Thread: A More Simple, Plainer America?

  1. #61
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    We still have some paint. It's off white. The baseboards are dark grayish black. Really original, right? The dining room 1/2 of the kitchen is going to be painted soon, because I just today got the new fabric for curtains. RIght now, it's wood with shellac, that's it. That's the way the house came (it's a log home) it's like living in a crate. No -- wait. It IS living in a crate!

  2. #62
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewGig View Post
    We still have some paint. It's off white. The baseboards are dark grayish black. Really original, right? The dining room 1/2 of the kitchen is going to be painted soon, because I just today got the new fabric for curtains. RIght now, it's wood with shellac, that's it. That's the way the house came (it's a log home) it's like living in a crate. No -- wait. It IS living in a crate!
    Log homes are cool, would love to see pics some day if you are willing to share!

  3. #63
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    I don't know how you feel about painting the interior of a log home, but I found some beautiful images of just that, like this one:


  4. #64
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    I love that picture Tybee, but no insulation, right? Or wrong?
    NewGig, can you please inform me? Now I'm curious about the insulation aspect since we live in New England.

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  6. #66
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    I don't know how you feel about painting the interior of a log home, but I found some beautiful images of just that, like this one:

    I think that’s beautiful, but I wonder how effective the paint is. How long does it take to paint, how many coats, and does it bleed thru after time goes by.

    I think log homes are cute and cozy and attractive, but they’re not for me. I need smooth walls with color.

    we have ongoing debate in our neighborhood about painting interior masonry walls. In my house, 30 years ago we built an addition, so what was an exterior wall became an interior wall. Without hesitation I painted it white. 30 years later I do not regret that, I still love my white brick kitchen wall.

    But if I was doing it today with an eye to selling our house, I would leave it “natural “red brick because that’s what people like.Our friend is getting ready to sell her house and she plans on painting her red brick wall because the mortar crumbles and that is messy, and I am begging her to leave it alone. New buyers won’t know that the mortar crumbles because people don’t know those things and they will most likely prefer a red brick wall. Of course she could always put polyurethane on it and keep it red.

    Another friend had a red brick wall and she thought it was great. I thought it was hideous. It was an interior wall that the Victorians never intended to be exposed, they used plaster. It was poorly tuck-pointed with globs of gray that didn’t match the brick. It was ugly. But she thought it looked cool. OK whatever, to each his own.

  7. #67
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    I like that look. My question is--is that interior really the log, or some type of shiplap? When I see log home interiors, they generally look like this, with either painted or natural, stained wood.

    Whitewashed-Cabin-1.jpg

    hqdefault.jpg
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  8. #68
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    Okay, we painted the living room. The living room has two exteriior, log walls and the remaining walls are wallboard. The logs require this prep: sanding lightly over the shellac and more strenuously over the knots. Cover knots with special knot hole paint. This amused me a lot, it made the wall look like it had been attacked by mosquitos at camp. The stuff starts pink and turns white when it dries. Then you sand it, again. Then you touch up any knots where the sanding took off too much of the cover. Then you sand those. Then you put down primer and sand it, twice. Then you paint, finally. Then you sand that. Then you put on the second coat. Then you sand that or do touch up. And you're done --- sort of.

    And four years later? The paint looks great, but all the knots now show through the paint, so the two walls need to be carefully sanded, the knots covered with shellac (what we decided to try this time), sanded, knot sealer, sand, primer, sand, paint. And we're hoping it doesn't look like hell when we do this. The paint is a Farrow and Ball product, $130 or so a gallon. We used 3 gallons on the living room. The baseboard paint doesn't need knot sealer, because the paint is blackish.

    When we paint the kitchen, we won't sand the knots. We'll just keep the shellac that's there. But the rest of it will be sanded, primered, and painted, like before.

    Re insulation? The log walls aren't insulated. There's a textured/drop ceiling on the upstairs portion of the house. There's insulation we're replacing in the downstairs floor joists. There's not much insulation on the ceiling where this place is one floor. We added a porch to the left side and put in an insulated slab for that. Which has made a big difference, both because the north face of the house isn't exposed and because of adding insulation.

    The interior of the log walls is milled, so it looks like shiplap. But for years I've said it looks like someone put in panelling when they were drunk, because they put it in going the wrong way. Saying it looks like shiplap is less amusing, but just as accurate!

    If we didn't also have wide plank pine floors downstairs, it would probably be pretty warm underfoot. As it is, the minisplit has made a huge difference. We augment it with the woodstove now. But when we heated with wood, the downstairs was cold. The upstairs has insulation atop the ceiling and under the roof. There's also insulation under the wall to wall carpet. We've been adding insulation to the basement/under the downstairs floor. It's difficult, because it's a crawlspace, rather than a full basement.

    So, interior? I have log walls. I have shiplap where we filled in a window opening, to make the wall look less unlog like. And I have wallboard. There's all of that. Basically, it's two log boxes joined together with one side open between them and plaster interior walls.
    Last edited by NewGig; 1-21-21 at 11:06am. Reason: typos

  9. #69
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Newgig, thanks for that thorough explanation of wall treatment on the logs.a lot of work!

  10. #70
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Wow, that does sound like a lot of work. Thanks for the explanation and I wish you a very satisfactory outcome for all your efforts!

    Thanks GP for the information on log houses.

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