Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 60

Thread: January frugals

  1. #41
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,268
    jeppy, fresh produce IS the most challenging thing about shopping infrequently. I shop about once a month for our major groceries. I usually make a mid-month stop at a Dollar General (on my way to volunteering on Sundays, masked and social distanced!!) to get more milk and eggs - we use a LOT of eggs. They are just inside the door, so I'm in and out in less than 2 minutes. We also get a fresh produce delivery every other week (Misfit's Market). This works pretty well for us. We use the fresh stuff first, and if it looks like we aren't going to, we freeze or dry it. And I don't get it right all the time - there's a fuzzy white eggplant currently waiting for the compost run right now. After the fresh stuff is gone, we move to frozen, canned, or stuff that stores well - apples, oranges, squash, etc. Since we buy almost all of our normal groceries at Aldi with the very occasional TJ suppliment, I use that cost savings to help offset the organic produce delivery cost. But we are resigned, in the winter months of Covid especially, to using less fresh produce. YMMV.

  2. #42
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts
    Posts
    5,548
    We tried shopping every two weeks briefly last spring, but we didn't do very well with it. We recently bought some new disposable masks that are supposed to have a 95% filtration rate (although not N95s) and I did feel a bit more comfortable at the grocery store wearing one of those last week. This conversation reminded me of a post I had read on this subject:
    https://www.thefrugalgirl.com/how-to...gn=grow_search

  3. #43
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saint Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    6,399
    As I try to shop biweekly, I've learned to eat certain vegetables in order. Spinach (and other salad greens) don't last very long. In fact, I've given up on salad mixes that contain any spinach -- especially in the more frugal big tub -- because I just can't get through it fast enough. String beans, cilantro, zucchini, and eggplant aren't very hardy, either, I've discovered. Bananas (for DW), cucumbers, and hot peppers are quite variable. Kale, turnip greens, cauliflower, broccoli, radishes; they seem to last for weeks and it's easy to separate the parts that are starting to go bad.

    So when I buy produce, we cook/eat the more fragile stuff first. We still can't make it two weeks without replenishing salad mix or bananas, but either we go without or they're part of a somewhat larger quick trip into a quiet grocery store near us. Curbside pickup has helped that somewhat but then I lose some control over which item to buy (DW prefers smaller bananas, but can we get small and greener or do we express a choice and hope the market can honor it?).
    Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome. - Booker T. Washington

  4. #44
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    3,295
    I have been using Forever Bags. They do help keep produce longer. Here is what I am talking about. FYI- I did not look elsewhere to see where they can be purchased.

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Forever-B...Count/30288565

  5. #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    188
    I was also having issues with spring mix not lasting long enough. So I switched to living lettuce. It comes with the roots attached so you soak it in the sink when brought home and then put it in a large measuring cup or bowl with a cover in the fridge. Keeps for weeks and you can just take a few leaves off as you wish for salads, sandwiches, etc.

  6. #46
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saint Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    6,399
    We actually have a planter in the house that would be big enough to grow salad greens. Maybe I should add that to my pile of pandemic projects.
    Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome. - Booker T. Washington

  7. #47
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts
    Posts
    5,548
    We've had good luck with salad greens from a local company, "Little Leaf Farms." I would recommend them for those living in my general area.

  8. #48
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    2,368
    "Little Leaf Farms." I would recommend them for those living in my general area.
    They are the best! Keeps for days without getting slimy like the mesclun salad mixes. I saw a video of their indoor operation, quite impressive.

  9. #49
    Senior Member Yppej's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    5,251
    I also like Little Leaf Farms. I have not had a problem with them, but not all stores carry them.

  10. #50
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,268
    I have a 90s era crockpot. I don't like much crockpot food (tasty food in, bland mushy gunk out) and have mainly used it to keep food hot at pot-lucks. One of the handles broke years ago, and we replaced it with a large wine cork. Last week I pulled it out becuase I found a Moroccan chicken stew recipe that sounded good (it was delish!!) and the other handle broke into a gazzillion plastic bits. So, after the stew was gone and the liner pulled for washing, DH replaced the second handle with a small nut and another wine cork. Looks funky but works just fine, and no money spent on a new appliance that won't get a lot of use.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •