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Thread: Calculating For Retirement

  1. #41
    Senior Member beckyliz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gardnr View Post
    If he's still quite independent he is far from stage 4. I urge you to get him to a Doc and diagnose. There are great meds for Alzheimer's and if that's it, her deserves the treatment.
    Gardnr, To clarify - the neurologist's diagnosis is "Dementia, probably Alzheimer's." I tried to get him into a drug study right after the DX, but the PET scan he had to have to see if he was eligible showed he had too much tau plaque. That tells me it's Alzheimer's. When I say stage 4 - I'm referring to stage 4 of the 7 stages of Alzheimer's developed by a Dr. Reisberg. Stage 4 is Moderate Decline. He is taking memantine (Namenda) and donepezil (Aricept).


    https://www.alzheimers.net/stages-of...imers-disease/
    "Do not accumulate for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and thieves break in and steal. But accumulate for yourselves treasure in heaven, where moth and rust do not destroy, and thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, your heart is also." Jesus

  2. #42
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    Becky, Alzheimer’s is difficult anytime but especially sad when someone isn’t that old. The journey with my friend was heartbreaking. She had a long period of time where she could drive, do some errands, only talk about the past (which gets tiring) but the stage after that was awful. Nothing so sad as not being able to talk and not knowing who someone is. I was relieved when her cancer came back. Interestingly my other friend had a dad with it whose experience was different. He never got grumpy and unhappy. My friend on the other hand was always happy before and miserable later. I hope your husband has as easy a journey as possible and is slow to get worse.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
    Becky, Alzheimer’s is difficult anytime but especially sad when someone isn’t that old. The journey with my friend was heartbreaking. She had a long period of time where she could drive, do some errands, only talk about the past (which gets tiring) but the stage after that was awful. Nothing so sad as not being able to talk and not knowing who someone is. I was relieved when her cancer came back. Interestingly my other friend had a dad with it whose experience was different. He never got grumpy and unhappy. My friend on the other hand was always happy before and miserable later. I hope your husband has as easy a journey as possible and is slow to get worse.
    Wow... not painful?

  4. #44
    Senior Member beckyliz's Avatar
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    Thank you, Teacher Terry. Yes, everyone's journey is different. Alzheimer's is just one type of dementia, which just adds to the different ways it affects people.

    I'm certainly learning lessons about appreciating where we are now, patience and choosing my battles.

    Didn't mean to high-jack the thread - but I appreciate everyone's support.
    "Do not accumulate for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and thieves break in and steal. But accumulate for yourselves treasure in heaven, where moth and rust do not destroy, and thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, your heart is also." Jesus

  5. #45
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beckyliz View Post
    Thank you, Teacher Terry. Yes, everyone's journey is different. Alzheimer's is just one type of dementia, which just adds to the different ways it affects people.

    I'm certainly learning lessons about appreciating where we are now, patience and choosing my battles.

    Didn't mean to high-jack the thread - but I appreciate everyone's support.
    I don’t think you hijacked it. Ypur husband’s health certainly affects your retirement plans.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    Frugal, she was miserable, non-verbal in diapers and having to be fed. It wasn’t living. She was on pain medication and kept comfortable. She fought ovarian cancer stage 4 for 20 years and recovered 7 times. I didn’t treat her cancer the last time. They think all the chemo that saved her life over and over caused her dementia. Plus her husband and I made the decision before he died. She had no family left. He said she didn’t want to live like that.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by beckyliz View Post
    Gardnr, To clarify - the neurologist's diagnosis is "Dementia, probably Alzheimer's." I tried to get him into a drug study right after the DX, but the PET scan he had to have to see if he was eligible showed he had too much tau plaque. That tells me it's Alzheimer's. When I say stage 4 - I'm referring to stage 4 of the 7 stages of Alzheimer's developed by a Dr. Reisberg. Stage 4 is Moderate Decline. He is taking memantine (Namenda) and donepezil (Aricept).


    https://www.alzheimers.net/stages-of...imers-disease/
    I'm glad to hear he is being treated for it. Many people garner several quality years with it before further demise through the stages.

  8. #48
    Senior Member Yppej's Avatar
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    February is the 81st month I have tracked my spending excluding payroll deductions. While I went over my aggressive budgeting goal for the month my average monthly spending went down by $2.00. The frugality forum helps keep me focused. My average is above EOY 2015 and 2020 but below EOYs for 2017, 2018, and 2019. I lost the 2016 EOY figure along the way.

    I use a notebook and calculator. When a page fills up I transfer over EOY and current year data and start a new page. Big expenses like roofing jobs account for the zigzagging up and down.

    Based on my figures I can retire at 70 assuming Medicare parts B, D, etc don't kill me.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    Yes, our retirement has been completely blindsided by family "obligations", unfortunately. I think this is a good thing to try to plan for-- perhaps just how to be more hard-hearted.
    --- There are definitely obligations that are not real, true obligations -- more like expectations that may or may not be realistic or reasonable.

    ---In our case, this is a true obligation of the heart and soul.

    Everyone has to think about these distinctions carefully, so I'm glad you wrote in Tybee, it's an important side to the question.

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