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Thread: Update re retirement

  1. #1
    Senior Member gimmethesimplelife's Avatar
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    Update re retirement

    We have been researching Columbia and are interested and it's very easy to get permanent residency paperwork there - but there are red flags in the mix, too. Columbia has things going for it but is no utopia.

    Decision made though. Post covid - if international travel resumes for real again - tickets to Bogota in premium economy. We'll see but this does seem feasible.....Rob

  2. #2
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    What are the pros/cons vs MX?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tradd View Post
    What are the pros/cons vs MX?
    https://www.usccb.org/issues-and-act...umbianrefugees
    IOW Colombia is Mexico on steroids.

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    Be cautious if by re Retirement you mean moving there. My boss of the 80s retired next door in Equador. Moving around via car there became difficult and expensive starting about 7y ago. Meaning, paying blood money "$20 if you wanna go down this road". And it was a daily occurrence. He and his wife ended up coming back when it then commenced to being dangerous d/t weapons being obvious.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Yppej's Avatar
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    You'll have plenty of fodder if you want to keep up your anti policy brutality efforts, as noted in the article I posted a link to in your thread Blue! Here it is again:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...43f_story.html

    Unless, given your spelling of the place, you are referring to South Carolina not South America.

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    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    I have a good friend who moved there a few years back to live. His wife was from there. He spoke the language fluently. He's a good problem solver, and not easily discouraged.

    He had plenty of capital, opened up a hotel and bought a cattle/guinea pig ranch.

    He lasted about 3 years, before moving back to Florida.

    The level of corruption and violence was a bit much.

    Be careful. My friend is very capable and resourceful, with local knowledge and contacts.

  7. #7
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeParker View Post
    https://www.usccb.org/issues-and-act...umbianrefugees
    IOW Colombia is Mexico on steroids.
    What is the date of that document? I looked for it without success and the info seems out of date. Colombia is actually helping the fleeing Venezualan refugees at present by giving them longterm visas leading to citizenship.
    That said, until you get close to the retirement date, there will be lots of changes in the South and Central American countries politics and finances. I would not be surprised to one day see that Cuba is a desirable retirement destination .

    Added later from BBC news:
    The most important humanitarian gesture in decades?

    Venezuela's ongoing economic and political turmoil could result in the biggest displacement of people in the world in recent years. It is an issue that has repercussions for the whole region.

    While many countries have acted to deter the migrants, Colombia has taken a step in a radically different direction, granting nearly a million undocumented Venezuelans the right to stay for 10 years.

    BBC Monitoring's Luis Fajardo looks at how the situation compares with other migrant crises around the world and where it leaves a country already struggling with unemployment and the coronavirus pandemic.
    Last edited by razz; 2-21-21 at 9:53pm. Reason: Add further info
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

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    Quote Originally Posted by razz View Post
    What is the date of that document? I looked for it without success and the info seems out of date. Colombia is actually helping the fleeing Venezualan refugees at present by giving them longterm visas leading to citizenship.
    That said, until you get close to the retirement date, there will be lots of changes in the South and Central American countries politics and finances. I would not be surprised to one day see that Cuba is a desirable retirement destination .

    Added later from BBC news:
    The most important humanitarian gesture in decades?

    Venezuela's ongoing economic and political turmoil could result in the biggest displacement of people in the world in recent years. It is an issue that has repercussions for the whole region.

    While many countries have acted to deter the migrants, Colombia has taken a step in a radically different direction, granting nearly a million undocumented Venezuelans the right to stay for 10 years.

    BBC Monitoring's Luis Fajardo looks at how the situation compares with other migrant crises around the world and where it leaves a country already struggling with unemployment and the coronavirus pandemic.
    The URL as posted works fine for me. https://www.usccb.org/issues-and-act...umbianrefugees

    Here's another one from November 2019 that talks about the massive number of displaced Colombians within Colombia and the influx of Venezuelans making the situation worse. https://p.dw.com/p/3JA63

    Maybe the current decision to grant Venezuelans legal status is legitimate, or maybe it's just a public relations ploy to deflect other countries criticizing Columbia, or maybe it's a ploy to get all those Venezuelan refugees registered so they can be tracked, taxed, and controlled. We won't know until we see what happens next. But there is nowhere south of the border I would want to live instead of here. If other people feel differently, they're welcome to move to whatever country they prefer whether it's England, Holland, Cuba, or someplace else. It's their life and their decision as far as I'm concerned.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    One of the problems with going to one of these countries is that they may be stable when you retire like Venezuela and then destabilize.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    Something to maybe consider:

    What if family who live in another country die and/or need help in their old age? Would you have the money to visit them?

    I’ve seen people whose parents retired to another country struggle with these issues.

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