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Thread: Somtimes your favorite movie/book was only good in retrospect

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    I think you mean transcendentalism.
    Actually I meant both. Ref: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/emerson/ "Emerson developed a metaphysics of process, an epistemology of moods, and an 'existentialist' ethics of self-improvement." But you're right that I should have said transcendentalism.

    Brain isn't always fully in gear in middle of the night.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by rosarugosa View Post
    I think for me and Catcher in the Rye, it was at least partly a stage of life thing. Adolescent angst was a lot more relevant to me when I first read the book.
    For most guys there's a 3-5 year period when almost anything vaguely antisocial seems really cool. For me that period coincided with the string of motorcycle gang B-movies. My mother, bless her heart, never objected to me watching them or having chopper posters on my bedroom walls. In fact she bought me a copy of "Hell's Angels" by Hunter S Thomson for my birthday. Obviously she knew it was just a phase and I wouldn't go far enough to get myself hurt or in trouble, even though I was pretty much mad at the whole world and had a lot of very legitimate reasons for being mad.

    The funny thing is, during those same years I also loved The Archie Show and The Banana Splits because they both had silly humor, the Archies had good bubblegum music, and the Banana Splits had the "Danger Island" serial (UH OH. Chongo!)

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    I read “Walden” and “The Meditations” at about the same time in my high school career, and was very impressed by both at the time. I tried reading both again recently, and while I’m still very affected by Marcus Aurelius, Thoreau seems like a smug, shallow poseur playing at philosophy.

    I agree about Thoreau and, so far, will not bother reading Walden again. While I agree with and enjoyed the idea behind his exercise, I didn't like how he seemed to do it at the expense and "use" of others while seeming to claim "freedom and independence".
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi
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    In a world where you can be anything - be kind. Unknown

  4. #34
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    I may need to watch West Side Story again. I bet I saw it 10 times at the movies....in the 60s.

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    Quote Originally Posted by happystuff View Post
    While I agree with and enjoyed the idea behind his exercise, I didn't like how he seemed to do it at the expense and "use" of others while seeming to claim "freedom and independence".
    Thoreau addresses that point directly while recounting his expenses:
    "Nothing was given me of which I have not rendered some account....To meet the objections of some inveterate cavillers, I may as well state, that if I dined out occasionally, as I always had done, and I trust shall have opportunities to do again, it was frequently to the detriment of my domestic arrangements. But the dining out, being, as I have stated, a constant element, does not in the least affect a comparative statement like this."

    Make of that what you will. But people who dislike him will always find something to dislike, and people who do like him will always overlook his flaws.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeParker View Post
    But people who dislike him will always find something to dislike, and people who do like him will always overlook his flaws.
    True.
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi
    Be nice whenever possible. It's always possible. HH Dalai Lama
    In a world where you can be anything - be kind. Unknown

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeParker View Post
    For most guys there's a 3-5 year period when almost anything vaguely antisocial seems really cool. For me that period coincided with the string of motorcycle gang B-movies. My mother, bless her heart, never objected to me watching them or having chopper posters on my bedroom walls. In fact she bought me a copy of "Hell's Angels" by Hunter S Thomson for my birthday. Obviously she knew it was just a phase and I wouldn't go far enough to get myself hurt or in trouble, even though I was pretty much mad at the whole world and had a lot of very legitimate reasons for being mad.

    The funny thing is, during those same years I also loved The Archie Show and The Banana Splits because they both had silly humor, the Archies had good bubblegum music, and the Banana Splits had the "Danger Island" serial (UH OH. Chongo!)
    I tried to interest my kid in “Aesop and Son” and “Commander McBragg”, but it seems that if it isn’t Japanese it’s not worth bothering with.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    I tried to interest my kid in “Aesop and Son” and “Commander McBragg”, but it seems that if it isn’t Japanese it’s not worth bothering with.
    When I was considering going to Japan and looked at tours, it was amazing to me how many focused on Japanese tech creations and visiting key sites. I didn't even understand what most of them were but found it interesting. Sort of like a pilgrimage to Elvis Presleys' home but I am sure that a lot more tech activities were involved in the Japanese sites.
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by razz View Post
    When I was considering going to Japan and looked at tours, it was amazing to me how many focused on Japanese tech creations and visiting key sites. I didn't even understand what most of them were but found it interesting. Sort of like a pilgrimage to Elvis Presleys' home but I am sure that a lot more tech activities were involved in the Japanese sites.
    If you want to see the real Japan, there's always the Kumano Kodō: Japan's ancient pilgrimage route: https://www.lonelyplanet.com/article...lgrimage-route

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeParker View Post
    If you want to see the real Japan, there's always the Kumano Kodō: Japan's ancient pilgrimage route: https://www.lonelyplanet.com/article...lgrimage-route
    That does sound like a wonderful trip to make when you are full of energy and time to enjoy it. The flight to Japan and return is exhausting itself.
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

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