Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25

Thread: Speaking of relationships

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,305

    Speaking of relationships

    I’ve been providing academic support for a student, 8th gr, 9th gr, and now 10th. After last year of online school for everyone, and he and I mostly working on FaceTime, our governor has ordered all students back to in-person school. Today was day 4.

    In chatting about how it’s going for him, I asked about classmates. He shook his head, and told me he’s focusing on establishing rapport with his teachers “because it will make all the difference if we have to go back to online-only classes.”
    I imagine he’s correct, but I find it an awfully sad situation.

  2. #2
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    7,984
    The teens are at a key stage of emotional and social development. Virtual learning has hopefully taught some degree of independence and self-responsibility about educating oneself. The social and emotional are harder to learn or teach without interaction with peers in a school or active social setting.
    It will be interesting to see what the research says about those entering post-secondary and their all-round preparation during virtual learning episode.

    Curious about the academic support that you provide - would you be comfortable sharing what that involves and how someone might get started doing this, how many students one might support. It may well be an especially essential service with all the disruptions to school in the past 18 months and teachers evaluate the students once they return to school.
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

  3. #3
    Senior Member Klunick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2021
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    216
    Kids, especially teens, can be cruel. Best that he develop relationships with adults over peers as most of his life, he will be dealing with adults. We told our boys that 99.999% of the time, after HS Graduation, you will never see or speak to anyone from HS who you thought were your friends. Sad but true.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    6,008
    Quote Originally Posted by Klunick View Post
    Kids, especially teens, can be cruel. Best that he develop relationships with adults over peers as most of his life, he will be dealing with adults. We told our boys that 99.999% of the time, after HS Graduation, you will never see or speak to anyone from HS who you thought were your friends. Sad but true.
    That's interesting, for my kids it has not been true--my sons still socialize with their high school friends and stay at their houses when they are in town, and they are 35 and 39. They are lucky that way.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Klunick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2021
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    216
    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    That's interesting, for my kids it has not been true--my sons still socialize with their high school friends and stay at their houses when they are in town, and they are 35 and 39. They are lucky that way.
    That is why I said 99% of the time. My brother is still friends with two people from HS and he will be flipping 61 in September!! My oldest is still friends with somebody from HS (graduated in 2019) so we'll see what happens 10 years from now and life changes occur.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    4,110
    We homeschooled. My oldest invited four adults to help celebrate her 13th bday. The next year she travelled to Europe with two of them. People used to ask me “aren’t you concerned that she relates to adults instead of her peers?” And I said “no. Someday her peers will be adults and she’ll be fine.” She still has two really good friends roughly her age from when she was 4 and 6, and friends from college. She’s also still super close with one of the adults from that birthday and said adults now 12 y.o.

    the youngest was swamped with friends her own age and is still in touch with many, and it’s been all drama all the time since age 10.

    The middle child had a small group of good buddies his age from scouts and they are all still tight. Including the one who is now a terrific young woman. The rest are good men.

    the only one who made me sad was the baby, because everything I had to give in support of her social life was not enough for her.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    12,013
    I am still friends with a friend from first grade, 4th grade and 4 from high school. We all get together every 3-5 years despite living all over the country. I have never been a fan of homeschooling.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Posts
    390
    My sibling home-schooled their step-daughter for several years--a small child in an accelerated program who was being bullied. It worked out well. I've long been a fan of home-schooling done thoughtfully and creatively.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Klunick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2021
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    216
    Quote Originally Posted by Jane v2.0 View Post
    My sibling home-schooled their step-daughter for several years--a small child in an accelerated program who was being bullied. It worked out well. I've long been a fan of home-schooling done thoughtfully and creatively.
    I bet online/virtual learning the last year was Heaven for those kids who were being bullied at school before. I hope they can continue online or had enough time in the meantime to switch schools before in person started back up.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    4,221
    I do wonder how the homeschooling will end up effecting our society, as a siblings kid, was in a EMT program, where they didn't even get their manuals, until last December (one week before the Xmas break, half way through the program). While the kids "graduated" from the program, I have heard it from that school district that they are no where near qualified that the year before were.
    Also how about those that are homeschooled, by either ignorant family, family that doesn't care, family with internet issues (one sibling lives in the country, internet is so poor, couldn't have multiple people using it at the same time), generally those with no support structure?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •